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Full text of "Allerlei"



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i* 




YotiNG Ladies' 

pa$l7io9abl^ 








OF ALL KINDS. 



Ihpi, McJIeil $ Hodgkins 

47 Temple Place, Boston. 



Liberal Discounts to Lasell Students. 



NEW MUSIC. 




COLLEGE SONGS FOR GIRLS. 

The first compilation ever made of the songs of Vassar, Smith, Wellesley, and 
other universities. 

MINSTREL SONGS, OLD AND NEW. 

All the old-time favorites, brought together in one volume, including Foster melo- 
dies, and the famous songs of Hays, Stewart, Christy, Bryant, Bloodgood, etc. 215 
pages. 

POPULAR PIANO COLLECTION NO. 2. 

It has proved the best selling volume we have ever issued ; 29 pieces. 

CLASSIC BARITONE AND BASS SONGS. 

Unquestionably the best collection of songs for low (male) voices ever issued in 
book form ; 151 pages. 

COMIC AND MINSTREL SONGS. 

A collection of the best selling and therefore the most popular gems of the day ; 
144 pages. 

OBISPAH WALTZES. 

Arranged in airs and themes from Hasty Pudding Play, Obispah. Very tuneful, 
pleasing and popular. Price, 70 cents. 



Oliver Ditson Company, 

453-463 Washington Street, Boston. 
C. H. DITSON & CO., 867 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



(2) 



L. P. Hollander 




Co. 



Boston : Boylston St. & Park Sq. 
New York : 29O Fifth Ave. 

Order Departments : 

COSTUMES, 
RIDING HABITS, 
COATS, 
MILLINERY, 



tf 



Newport : Casino Building. 
Paris Office : 21 Rue Bergere. 

Ready- Made Departments : 

MANTLES, COATS, 
TRAVELLING WRAPS, 
DRESSES and SKIRTS, 
TRIMMED HATS. 



with Materials 
for Waists. 



GLOVES. — Our Special Makes. 

New England Agents for FASSO CORSETS. 






FINE DRESS GOODS 



IN EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS. 






OUR HOUSE IS CELEBRATED FOR ITS DISTINCTIVE TASTE AND LEADING IDEAS ON FASHIONS. 

(3) 



Cobb, Aldrich & Co. 

the elegant new store, 
Washington and Knkkland Streets 



Situated in the corner of our elegant new store, between the two main entrances, is our Confectionery Department, 
which is one of the largest and the handsomest of any in this city. This is fully stocked with 



• • 



Jfresb Confectionery 



of all kinds of the finest French Candies, including Nougatines, Bavarian, St. Nicholas, Montevideo, Nanon, Operas, 
Chocolate Covered Caramels, Opera Caramels, Crystallized French Fruits, etc. Also the more common kinds. All of 
which are strictly and absolutely pure, and sold at moderate prices. 

3K 



The Finest Grocery Store in America. 

COBB, ALDRICH & CO., BOSTON. 



(4) 



Ieorge 



DEALER IN 



Cbtna, (3lass anb j^ottet^ 



OF ALL COUNTRIES, 



39 prar^lir; Street, eor. Jteu/ley, 



BOSTON. 



LAB1ES 



WISHING TO PURCHASE - 
THE CORRECT STYLES IN 



* MILLINERY, N> 



AT LOWEST PRICES, 
SHOULD CALL 



r: c T E T s HE BeaeaET, 

134 Tremont Street, Bcston, l£ass. 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO MOURNING ORDERS. 




FOE 

pretty ano St^lisb flDillinerp 

— GO TO — 

7VTrs. J. J. GRHCE, 

LA MODE, 

26 TEMPLE PLACE. 




For Fine Millinery Visit 

GEO. 7VY. iflZETHERN, 
21 AND 23 TEMPLE PLACE. 



Strictly 3first>(£lass (Booos at popular prices. 



ALL tHe Latest Novelties in 



IN6 7V^IL-L-INE5RY 



Are shown on our counters as soon as in Paris, London or Berlin Market. 
Your patronage is respectfully solicited. 

GEO. M - WETHERN- 



WHAT WRITING P^PER DO YOU USE? 



I 



If you desire THE LEADING WRITING papers ask your dealer for 

!©06t0n XinCtl (for society correspondence,) 
36O0tOn !fi$Ont) (for foreign correspondence.) 
jBUttKCt* IDlll (for ordinary correspondence.) 

These papers are not only superior in quality but are reasonable in price. They 

are used in every State and Territory in the Union and their increasing popularity is 

without precedence. They are made in all the leading sizes, styles and finishes, with 

envelopes to match. If your dealer does not keep them and will not get them for you, 

send us six cents and we will forward you our complete samples, representing more 

than 250 varieties. 

1 * ■ 

SAMUEL WARD COMPANY (incorporate), 
Paper Merchants, Stationers, Engravers and Printers, 

49 and 51 Franklin Street (entire building), Boston, Mass. 



(5) 





HAAAOim F)NOWLTON £f Co. 

G. A. Hammond, C. C. Knowlton, Louis Hauchhaus, 

Putnam, Conn. New York City. New York City. 

Silk /Hbanufacturere, 

Putnam, Connecticut, 

* 

Machine Silks, Sewing Silks, 

Button-Hole Twists, and Tailors' Silk Braids. 

* 

SALESROOMS: 

Main Office, 524 Broadway, NEW YORK. 
83 and. 85 Summer Street, Boston. 238 and 2-40 Rifth Avenue, Chicago. 

5 North Third Street, Philadelphia. 

(6) 



Carpets and Rugs. 




646 to 6S8 

WASHINGTON STREET, 
OPPOSITE BOYLSTON 
STREET, .... 



yohn H. Pray, Sons & Co. 



IS THE LOCATION 

OF OUR 

NEW STORE. . . . 




Upholster j Fabric^ 



(7) 



Oaftng 3^. 



(i radiation Dresse^ 



. . . THE LATEST STYLES AT 

MODERATE PRICES 

SPECIAL TERMS FOR 

CLASS OR CLUB OUTFITS. . . 



SPECIAL TERMS TO 

CLASSES FOR GRADUATION 
DRESSES TO ORDER 



BloQse (iMsf^. 



Dress CrGDcfy 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF THE VERY LATEST PARIS AND LONDON 

NOVELTIES, AND ARE ALWAYS GLAD TO SEND SAMPLES. IT WILL BE WORTH 
WHILE FOR YOU TO REMEMBER THIS AFTER YOU ARE AT HOME 

# * * 

R. H. STEARNS & C^ 

TREMONT STREET & TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON. 

(S) 



Bettor? & 



y^lbapy i^. i^. 




The Only FIRST-CLASS Through Car Line 

From 

NEW ENGLAND 

To 

THE WEST. 



THE ONLY LINE RUNNING THROUGH SLEEPING CARS OYER 
THE FAMOUS 

Mew York Central 6c Hudson River, 
Lake Shore 6c Michigan Southern, 
Michigan Central, 
and Big Four Railroads. 



1 1 v e yjortey. atyd tq BUFFALO) Cleveland, Detroit, columbus, dayton, Cincinnati, 
/T\05t Direct F{out^ st. louis, Chicago, and all points in the west, southwest 

AND NORTHWEST 

For information, rates, time-tables, maps, etc., apply to any ticket agent, or address, 

A. S. HANSON, 

G. P. A., Boston, Mass. 

(9) 




Wmitrm'S 

Ibanbfcercbtefe. 




a 




lEmbroifcen? Clotbs, anfc 
Silk an& Xinen jf losses 
useb in lEmbroifcerinc*. 




<^ 




N. B. — We make a Discount in Prices on Wedding 
Outfits. 



temple place, BoaTore. 




(10) 




EDWARD LASELL, 

Professor of Chemistry, Williams College. 
FOUNDER OF LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS. 






ALibERbCI 






VOLUME II 



AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 
i 892 




1851 




1892 




j^ebication. 



HIS to tl^e rr\erriory of t\\e last year's class, 
Wr[0, beir^ found n\ost Utterly triable 

To edit oqe trierriselVes, -We dedicate, 
We consecrate ^witt) tears our "flllerlei." 






v^ 



s. 



€ 



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NotJEastohSlqw" 





Editors. 

NELLIE M. RICHARDS Managing |Editor, 

FLORA M. GARDNER, 

MARIE BROTHERTON, 
NELLE G. DAVIS, 

MARGARET D. BRODRICK. 

ALMA R. HUBBARD . . . Business Manager. 




Preface. 




^WO years have passed since our fore-goers embarked on the daring enterprise of issuing an 

^ Annual. We were then in our infancy, having the characteristics pertaining to that stage of 

existence, — simplicity, gentleness, and a profound reverence for seniors ; in fact, we were 

Freshmen. We gazed upon the glorious result of our noble Juniors' loyally united efforts, 

and scarcely dared go beyond gazing ; the work was a masterpiece, and we would seem to defile 

it by the touch of our hands. But they told us we must follow their example, some day ; and 

in very terror each one cast about in her mind for some one thing which she might drop, and so 

make her no longer a member of that doomed class. 

However, the next year found us Sophomores, and although not deserving of those attributes 
usually assigned to the " omniscient Soph.," yet we were older, and naturally more wise. We could 
not but watch with interest the benign countenances of our present noble Senior class as they started in 
on the magnum opus of the Junior year. We sympathized with them inwardly, though they seemed 
in little need of it. Gradually, however, the expression faded, and gave place to one of fast-increasing 
agony as they found that they were utterly unable to accomplish the task. The second Annual did 
not appear ,: and do you think our sympathy was theirs any longer ? No, it vanished, and was replaced 
by a different feeling ; but then and there was formed in the minds of a few undergraduates a purpose 
to do or die. 

(21) 



And so, in this year, eighteen hundred ninety-two, we bring before you the second number of 
the 'ALLERLEI, hoping that you will take time, consider our youth and inexperience, and then pronounce 
your verdict. We realize that many improvements might be made, and many faults corrected : we will 
do this, if you will give us another chance by letting us off leniently this time. 

In our jokes, if there be any, we have tried to deal with all alike, so that no one may feel 
himself overlooked if his weak points are not brought out where he can look at them calmly as his 
neighbors do, and in every case the individual should feel honored by the very mention. 

Our Alma Mater has her weak points, — what fond mother has not ? — and if the few are shown, 
they only reveal the multitude of strong ones the more clearly. We have sought to represent each 
department faithfully, and hope that in our preoccupation none have been omitted. 

Let us express our gratitude to all those who have so kindly aided us in our enterprise by 
their encouragement and labor, for without them we were powerless to accomplish our mission. 

And now we send out our little book, asking you to take it as it is, not criticising it before you 
read it, while we prepare to seek our reward, — a rest. As our predecessors advised, we began early in 
the year, have worked night and day, and kept a stiff upper lip. To those who do not think this 
may prove wearing, we would say, "Try it, and report the results." What remains of our weary frames 
bids you all, readers, farewell. 




(22) 




5oard of Trustees. 

REV. WM. R. CLARK, D.D., 

REV. C. PARKHURST, D.D., 

PROF. JULES LUQUIENS, 
C. C. BRAGDON, 

MRS. C. C. BRAGDON. 




Faculty. 



CHARLES C. BRAGDON, M.A., 

Principal. 

CAROLINE A. CARPENTER, 

English Literature and History. 



CATHARINE J. CHAMBERLAYNE, 

French. 

URSULA CUSHMAN, 

Logic, Psychology, and History of Art. 



WILLIAM J. ROLFE, M.A., 

Shakespeare. 

LILLIE M. PACKARD, Ph.B., 

Mathematics. 

LIZZIE SHINN, B.A., 

Latin and Greek. 

ADELE ROTH, 

French and German. 



(24) 



GABRIELLE NOURY-ABBOT, 

French. 

HERBERT LOWELL RICH, Ph.B., 

Natural Sciences. 

MARY E. TAPPAN, 

English. 

ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL, 

Book-keeping and Penmanship. 

ISABEL SHINN, 

Elocution. 

HENRY ORNE RYDER, 

Drawing and Painting. 

JOSEPH A. HILLS, 

Piano, Harmony, and Theory of Music. 



J. WALTER DAVIS, 

Voice Culture, and Chorus Singing. 

WILLIS E. NOWELL, 

Violin. 



GEORGE W. BEMIS, 



Guitar. 



KATE E. PLUMMER, 



Organ. 



MARTHA E. RANSOM, 

Physical Culture. 



FLORENCE WELLS, 



Assistant in Gymnastics. 



MARY L. NUTT, 

Averse. 



(»S) 



MAJOR GEORGE H. BENYON, 

Military Drill. 

FRANCIS N. PELOUBET, 
Bible. 

ANNA BARROWS, 

Cooking — Demonstrations. 

ANNIE M. NICHOLLS, 



Practice Cooking. 



ROSE E. HARKINS, 



Dress-cutting. 



JULIA FOWLE, 

Millinery. 

REBECCA G. WINDSHIP, 

Art Needlework. 



S. G. GREENWOOD, 

Phonography and Typewriting. 



MARY P. WITHERBEE, 

Assistant in Laboratory. 




(26) 




September 17. 

September 19. 

September 22. 

September 23. 

September 29. 




November 18. 
November 19. 
November 24. 
December 6. 



" Forced from their home a melancholy train." 

Decision of Faculty that no study needed for such bright minds. 

Wanted — Bass voices for chorus classes. 

Annual " choice bits " retailed in chapel for benefit of new girls 
Sister Plummer hates " here." 

October 2. "Old well" viewed at Newport. 

OCTOBER 4. Muscles enlarged while you wait. 

October 15. Saw nurse of "Baby McKee." 

NOVEMBER 4. One invitation received for the wedding on Nov. 

November 12. Junior Lit. class studying. Miss " Pippa passes." 
Lessons given on how to boil water. 

After this date chapel exercises to come directly after dinner. 
Usual amount of turkey devoured. 

Was Sunday. 

(27) 




18, '91. 






DECEMBER 7. Girls learned that a minor is a man working in a mine. 
DECEMBER 10. Favored by Tech. Glee and Banjo Clubs. 
December 21. Holiday of two weeks began. 
December 25. Xmas. 

JANUARY 6. Ground damp around the Sem. 

January 12. Helen Medsker answered a question in Trigonometry 

January 17. "Old man" was present in the studio. 

January 29. Last law lecture given this P.M. 

February 5. School-year half gone. 
February 14. St. Valentine's Day. 
February 22. Sale of fancy dress costumes. 
FEBRUARY 27. Lasellia's attended the S. D.'s irregular meeting. 

February 28. Favorite date of one of the Seniors. 

MARCH 5. Jobs requested for benefit of the heathen 

March ii. Juniors made aware of their " contemptable " conduct 

March 19. Seniors appeared in their caps and gowns. 

March 24. James was here. 
MARCH 27. Prof, of Chemistry appeared in new role of "Bonnie Scotch Laddie." 

(2S) 





March 31. The great S. S. came into existence. 

April i. That fatal leap.* 

April 2. Annual game dinner. 

April 3. Lady Somerset spoke to the girls in chapel. 

APRIL 7. Seniors and Juniors given a reception by the Faculty. 

APRIL 13. Delightful concert in the Gym. 

April 14. Misses Wells and Hogg walked to Boston. 

April 30. Gym. closed. 

May 1. Little Currier went to church. 

May 12. It rained. 

May 13. Annual fish dinner? 

May 15. Grand stock-clearance sale. 




* For explanation see " chained gang." 





(29) 




% 



CLASSES 



• i il . L\ X X h X ^ 





(( 



j+j^OW green you are and fresh in this old worfd 



)) 




Rrssh|rr|an Gla 



•*^Vgr5«s?-<- 



MOTTO : Palma 11011 sine labore est. 



Class Colors: black and Orange. Class flower: Ox-eye Daisy. 



LOTTIE C. EDDY, President. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOM-.. 


Grace L. Allen . . . 




52 


Carolyn E. Gilmax . . 


Marshalltown, la. . 


66 


Alice Andreesen . . . 


. Omaha, Neb. 


52 


Bertha A. Lillibridge 


. Minneapolis, Minn. 


Annex 


Carrie E. Batchelder 


South Boston, Mass. 




Marie McDonald . . 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


. . 25 


Sara A. Bond . . . 


. Cliftondale, Mass. 


6 


Ella Sheldon .... 


. Hamberg, N.J. 


. . 11 


K. Belle Bragdon . . 


. Auburndale, Mass. 




Sibyl H. Spaulding . . 


. Auburndale, Mass. 




Una Cole 


Chester, Ills. 


45 


Carrie L. Steel . . . 


. Portland, Ore. . 


59 


Mattie S. Deardorff . 


. Kansas City, Mo. . 


57 


Carrie W. Van Sickle 


. North River, N.Y. 


. . 8 


Ella M. Eddy . . . 


. Bay City, Mich. . . 


• 36 


Willie A. Stowe . . . 




24 


Lottie C. Eddy . . . 


. Bay City, Mich. . . 


• 33 


Louise C. Whitney . . 


. Bay City, Mich. . 


40 



(Si) 



FRESHMAN HISTORY. 



ax 



'E, the class of '95, have been requested to relate our history; but we consider that the class, 
like the nation, is happiest that has no history. 

We were from the beginning a very enterprising class, so that thus far we can boast our 
course marvellously free from any serious mistakes. We bespeak the veracity of our motto, Palma nou 
sine labore est, and we might mention one instance in which this was proved : after having spent 
the previous evening in a more hilarious manner than usual, and therefore not having prepared our 
history as was our custom, we were next day honored with a visitor. But on account of our extreme 
modesty — being abashed by the sight of a stranger rather than on account of our diligence in 
preparing the lesson — we were unable to recite. 

The talents and achievements of the various members of our class are entirely too numerous 
to mention individually, but we will give a general idea of '95 in this modern poetic creation: 

Her eyes are dark and bright. 

Her mother, too, has taught her 
To smile and talk polite. 

And she has many virtues, 
Which isn't hard to see; 

And so the girl of '95 

Is just the girl for me. 

(34) 



About '95 we may say further, that she is up, way up, in physical culture, and is graceful 
as well as athletic, and well disciplined; for has she not four officers in the battalion, besides her 
well-trained privates? who, we doubt not, if they should be led forth in battle against the army of 
grinders who daily assail us with a medley comprising "Annie Rooney," " McGinty," "Comrades," and 
other of the latest selections, would rout the enemy and return with flying colors. 

At our annual class reception we received the outer world in a manner so affable and gracious, 
that by our tact the occasion was rendered such that it will never be obliterated from the minds of 
those who were so fortunate as to be present. 

Our class flower, the daisy, is well chosen and peculiarly suited to us, in that its pure beauty 
expresses innocence, and that it, like us, springs from all points of the compass ; and thus when we 
shall return to our homes we shall inspire all future generations of school girls, whom we chance to 
meet, by our artlessness and grace into following in our footsteps, so that after they have entered 
the hallowed walls of Lasell, and have made themselves masters of art, language, and science, they 
will graduate with all honor to themselves, and going forth into the world will impart the brilliancy 
bequeathed them by us to all posterity. 

Thus shall our name become famous, and we at last shall have a history. 




(35) 




(I 




years bu{ young, 6uf fiis experience old. 



n 




Sophorrjors Glass. 



MOTTO : U\(pn nobis solum sed omnibus. 



Class Colors: White and Gold. Class Flower: Daisy. 



HELEN BOULLT MEDSKER, President. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


Julia W. Anderson . 


. Taylorville, III. . . 


65 


Jennie M. Rich . . . 


Bethel, Me. . . . 


. . 16 


Lottje F. Appel . . 


. Denver, Col. 


64 


L. Mabel Sawyer . . 


Auburndale, Mass. 




L. Mabel Case . . 


. South Manchester, Conn 


4 


Harriet G. Scott . . 




. . 28 


Daisy E. Curtis . . 


. Medfield, Mass. . . 


24 


Rebecca C. Shepherd . 


Auburndale, Mass. 




Clara F. Eddy . . 


. Bay City, Mich. . . 


36 


Gertrude Sherman . . 


Wollaston Heights, 


Mass. 5 


Julia E. Hogg . . . 


. Fort Worth, Texas 


18 


Mollie St. John Taylor 


Omaha, Neb. 


• • 4 


Carrie B. Johnson . 


. Brewsters, N.Y. 


44 


May Tulleys .... 


Council Bluffs, la. 


. . 62 


Helen B. Medsker . 


. Kansas City, Mo. . . 


25 


Mildred C. Warren 


New Boston, N.H. 


• • 63 


Alice Noble . . . 


. Tiffin, Ohio .... 


5° 


Eliza H. Warren . . 


Fall River, Mass. 




Lucy S. Pinney . . 


. Chicago, Ills. . . . 


3i 


Virginia Wyckoff . . 


Hightstown, N.J. 


. . 6 


Lotta J. Proctor 


. Waterville, Me. . . 


. 76 









(39) 



SOPHOMORE HISTORY. 



WE are the class of '94. The charming innocence of our freshman days we have left behind us ; we 
have triumphantly passed through every ordeal and have at last risen to the dignity of Sophomores, 
the acme of all our hopes and ambitions. For the Juniors are a little lower than the Seniors, 
and the Senior, although now she may seem to be on the, to us, unattainable heights of bliss, will 
soon cease to exist. And to be a soulless Freshman whose brain, like the geometrical solid o'er which 
she daily pores, is " a limited portion of space" — but we have passed that stage of our existence and now 
class it among the memories of the painful past. We have always been noted for the unusual size of our 
cerebellum, and, consequently, are the delight of our teachers and the community at large. Our brilliancy, 
although at all times wonderful, is shown to a marked degree in Bible class, where, at the request of our 
instructor, we draw such a map showing the location of the seven cities of Asia Minor as would cause 
even a member of the Royal Geographical Society to wonder. In trigonometry our mental ability is also 
displayed, and since we are now studying" higher mathematics we, in regard to all lower branches, follow 
St. Paul's example — "Forgetting those things which are behind and reaching forth unto those things which 
are before." But in Latin our knowledge is unsurpassed, for not even the Horace class has so many mem- 
bers as we that daily read " at sight" the appointed lesson. 

All lives have clouds as well as sunshine, and the most cloudy days in ours are those on which we 
recite Physics ; but as we amble forth from the subterranean laboratory, weary and worn, 

The sweetly solemn thought 

Comes to us o'er and o'er, 

We're nearer through our physics' course 

Than we've ever been before. 

(40) 



But now, having spoken of the less aesthetic of our duties, we mention English, — last, but not by any 
means least ; for in this latter study we excel all previous records, not only in our knowledge of theories, 
but indeed in our natural ability. For all know that the poet is born, not made ; and did we not each 
compose a poem so unique in construction and so entirely different from any previously known in the annals 
of American literature that it caused great surprise and pleasure, and also some unseemly mirth, when read 
in our class? And we doubt not that these productions would be duly appreciated by the world at large, 
were they but once made public. 

Even from our infancy we have been fastidious in our tastes, and our artistic tendencies are shown 
in the selection of our class colors. Elephant's-breath and dragon's-blood were rejected with scorn, and 
even green and purple, although an entirely new combination, were too commonplace for us, so finally white 
and gold were unanimously chosen as symbolic of our purity and worth. The great popularity of our class 
is not to be questioned, for there is not a club or society in which we have no representatives, even to the 
small and select SvpE' club, in which one of our members is prominent. Although we have not studied 
the history of art, as have our learned Seniors, yet we flatter ourselves that in a few cases we are better 
connoisseurs of the masterpieces of our great artists than they. To show that we are not presuming in the 
estimation of our own ability we record one little incident, in which a Senior gazing with enraptured 
eye upon Rosa Bonheur's perfect picture "Lion and Lioness" exclaimed to one of our brilliant Sopho- 
mores, "Why, I didn't know a tiger was a female lion!" We will draw the curtain while the Sophomore 
smiles audibly. And now we will look forward and see that in the years to come, when we shall hear 
of the mighty achievements of the various members of our class, we shall say with pardonable pride, " I 
knew that girl ; she was a member of our Sophomore class." For 

" Some men are born great, 
Some men achieve greatness, 
And some men have greatness thrust upon them." 

To the first division we all belong. 

(41) 




a 



fj'tf put a girdle round about the earth in forty minutes. 



yy 




zJuriior Glass. 



MOTTO: t7\(b/ finished, but begun. 



Class Color : blood-red and Gold. Class Flower : jacqueminot rose. 



Guardian Angel. 





NELLIE M. RICHARDS President. 

FLORA M. GARDNER Secretary. 

ALMA R. HUBBARD Treasurer. 



NAMES. 

Jennie M. Arnold . . 
Margaret D. Brodrick 
Marie Brotherton * 

Eva L. Couch . . . . 

Nelle G. Davis . . . 

Flora M. Gardner . . 



RESIDENCES. 

Peabody, Mass. 
Elkhart, Ind. . 
Lima, Ohio . 
Round Pond, Me. 
Chicago, 111. 



Chicago, 111. 



ROOMS. 

• 33 

72 

Annex 
32 
30 
31 



Jessie M. Gaskill 
Alma R. Hubbard 
Harriet Noble . . 
Nellie M. Richards 
Esther Scouller 
Ida O. Short . . . 



* Junior Specials. 



RESIDENCES. 

Woonsocket, R.I. 



Wheeling, W. Va. 



Tiffin, Ohio . . . 
Newton Centre, Mass. 
North East, Penn. 
North East, Penn. 



5 
26 

5° 
27 

43 

4} 



(45) 



A 



JUNIOR HISTORY. 

We are Seven " 
Plus Five. 

ii ^T ND thereby hangs a tale." In good old story-book style it begins. For once upon a time there 
arrived a bevy of fair maidens at Lasell. They banded themselves together and chose for their name 
" The class of '93." The golden fleece for which they searched must have been hidden away in 
ponderous books, on extensive maps or charts, in Saratoga trunks or Huyler's bon-bon boxes, for 'twas 
over one or the other of these that they pored throughout the days, months, and years. Did they find this 
treasure for which they sought so diligently, laboring in the light of glorious old Sol all the day long, and 
though they burned not the midnight oil, by the flickering light of a candle they toiled till the witching 
hours of night? 

Read our answer in the dog-eared books and the well-worn dictionary on the crowded book-shelf; 
in the closely written manuscript lying on the table ; in the empty boxes, which speak volumes, or in the 
banjo, which hangs upon the wall ; and if they whisper only of midnight feasts and indignation meetings, 
then seek out our " Guardian Angel." 

" Nothing succeeds like success ! ' : And were not we first in the ranks? The first to tire of that 
oft-recurring pudding ; the first to go on a strike ; the first to skate on our heads when out with a skating- 

party? Indeed, we are so wonderfully spry, that one of our members rose from her bed, hastily arrayed 

(46) 



herself and descended for breakfast — at midnight, having been awakened by the late returners from a Patti 
concert, and misled into the belief that it was early morning. 

Our glory culminated on the nineteenth of March, when we demonstrated by our junior enter- 
tainment that " None are so deaf as those who won't hear," and that " When Greek meets Greek then 
comes the tug of war." We also exhibited to the admiring public the male members of our class. No 
class here ever accomplished this feat before, and the faculty kindlv assures us that no class shall ever be 
able to repeat it. This alone stamps us as illustrious class-women. 

To us is the credit of the first appearance of the Seniors' caps and gowns, for they graced our enter- 
tainment in complete Senior paraphernalia. 

Not only as a whole but as individuals are we noteworthy. One of us has appeared as " The living 
skeleton" in a circus; another, although merely a Gardner, is the sister of Padderosky ; while the sire of 
a third is the manager of some fair or other in Chicago ; a fourth is a Noble ; and shall we stop Short, 
never to go again ? 

But why should I enumerate all these trivial matters, when I need only to state that we have sur- 
passed our noble Seniors and have succeeded in publishing the first Annual since the year 1890. In triumph 
we bring forth the Allerlei. For '•' 'tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print ; a book's a book, 
although there's nothing in 't." 




(47) 




^rQ^jJ have Seen at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps. 



) j 




Ssriior Glass. 



MOTTO : True Lives and Earnest. 



Class Colors: White and Apple-green. Class Flower: White Carnation. 



Honorary Member. 
FRANCES E. WILLARD. 

SADIE W. BURRILL President. 

MARY P. WITHERBEE Secretary and Treasurer. 



Sadie W. Burrill 
Alice E. Cole . 
Edna M. Dice . . 
Alice G. Donallan 
Mabel C. Falley 



RESIDENCES. ROOMS. 

Ellsworth, Me 42 

Chester, 111 44 

Crawfordsville, Ind. . . 7 

Lynn, Mass. .... 9 

S. Evanston, 111. ... 28 



Desdemona Milliken 
Anna Staley . . . 
Jessie F. Vilas . . 
Mary P. Witherbee 
Julia T. Wolfe . . 



RESIDENCES. 

Decatur, 111. 
Ottawa, Kan. 
Chicago, 111. 
Laurel, Del. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 



Annex 

27 

7 

• 78 

23 



(50 



SENIOR HISTORY. 



PROF. — "Who is that yonder with the serene and dignified air, and the brow .upon whose broad 
expanse thought has traced unmistakable characters?" 
Soph. — " Oh, that is one of the Seniors. Do you want to look at her? You may go quite 
close if you care to, she will not mind, but you must not speak to her. She is saying her 
Barbara, Idarent, Darii, Ferio" 

The Boston University professor bowed his head and tiptoed reverently away. 

Behold the Senior class filing in funereal procession into the chapel, clad in the habiliments of — woe, 
you were about to say, but glancing from the sable of the gowns to the sunshine of the faces you check 
yourself, and say, of rejoicing, instead. The tumult of the little undergraduates suddenly ebbs to breathless 
silence as these fair maidens take their places, and even the faculty are somewhat awed by the gloom of 
that long black front row, till they too, catching a glimpse of the faces, feel relieved. 

The world is awaiting in eager impatience the time when they will go forth to illumine her darkness 
with their light (not lightness) . But poor Lasell groans at the thought of her coming loss, and it is 
vaguely whispered among the girls that with a prudent man's forethought the principal has planned to open 
a school in California next year ; for to reorganize Lasell after the loss of her most dazzlingly brilliant lights 
is not to be thought of. The contrast would be too painful ; one would constantly be saying with Hamlet 
" Look here upon this picture, and on this." 

Among the elect number is one wiser than all her teachers, who in coming years will preside as she is 
now presided over, and teach (to use a new and startling metaphor which the historian has been carefully saving 
for this occasion) the young idea how to shoot. Another member is soon to preside in a different sort of 
sphere, where little Scotch thistles will doubtless take the place of the young ideas just now mentioned. 

(52) 



That dark-haired maid near the end of the seat will one day make our America listen with bated 
breath, as old Greece used to listen in the days when Demosthenes was wont to address her in ' l plain 
English ; "' and the saucy brunette by her side will meanwhile be infusing the fire of her own transcendent 
genius into the incipient orators whose glorious fortune it will be to be counted among her pupils, so that 
the torch of eloquence shall burn brightly for years uncounted. 

For others new spheres are to be created, as this narrow globe of ours has no place large enough 
for their greatness. Mars has sent his carriage with a written invitation, and Saturn applied for one of them 
to make a chemical examination of his rings; but both have been refused. Had they been wedding rings, 
O Saturn ! how many would have been the applicants for your little job ! Only the poet remains, whom 
the faculty have been glad to pay liberally to refrain from writing her inspirations. Some of the class have 
blessed the school for many years, some for not more than three or four, and still others for only two. 

Maine, Massachusetts, Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and, yes, actually, little Delaware, have 
daughters in '92. These gifted young ladies represent almost every branch of industry : music, oratory, 
literature, teaching, house-keeping, experimental chemistry, and freehand drawing, mastered by persevering 
and laborious practice in class hours upon the backs of the settees in front of the artist, before whose mind 
flitted continually but vainly the shadowy image of a wash-basin and sponge, with Miss Carpenter sternly 
superintending the erasure of these maiden efforts of their genius. 

We have tried to tell what this class is and what it can do. Did not limited space forbid, we 
would go on to tell what it is not and what it cannot do ; but the art is long and time is fleeting, 
and our eager reader must restrain his curiosity until future years have unfolded in its full development 
the blossom which is barely budding into beauty now, and displayed to the world the complete history of 
the class of '92. 




(S3) 



IRRSGaiijqRS. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


Georgianna F. Adams . 


. Roxbury, Mass. . . 


60 


Bessie L. Comstock 


Ivoryton, Conn. 


. . . 13 


Agnes F. Aldrich . . 


. McLean, 111. . . . 


Annex 


Laura R. Comstock . . 


Ivoryton, Conn. 


• • • 13 


Gracia M. F. Barnhart 




10 


Jessie I. Connell . . 


. Joliet, 111. . . 


• • • 49 


Alice M. Beaumont . . 


. East Hartford, Conn. 


47 


Grace R. Coon . . . 


Saratoga Springs, 


N.Y. 63 


Helen W. Boss . . . 


San Francisco, Cal. 


53 


Anna E. Crocker . . 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


. . . 54 


Isabel E. Bronson . . 


Ottawa, Ont. 


29 


Louise Currier . . . 




. . . 19 


Allie B. Brooks . . . 


Owasso, Mich. 


61 


Frances B. Davenport . 


. Elkhart, Ind. 


. . . 72 


Eugenie E. Burbank 


Whitinsville, Mass. 


16 


Carrie H. Dole . . . 


. Lebanon, N.H. . 


Annex 


Edna G. Burdick . . 




35 


Daisy G. Earle . . . 


. Newton, Mass. 




Mae A. Burr .... 


Lincoln. Neb. 


48 


Bessie L. Eaton . . . 


. Maiden, Mass. . 


. . . 41 


Claire A. Chamberlin . 




H 


Louise M. Elwood . . 


. Joliet, 111. . . 


■ ■ • 49 


Josephine B. Chandler 




4i 


Clara B. Farquhar . . 


. Newton, Mass. 


. . . 19 


Dorothy A. Chapman . 




10 


Elizabeth W. Fleming 


. Shelbyville, Ind. 


. . . 70 


Ellen A. Chase . . . 


Walnut Hill, Mass. . 


70 


Maria T. Gage . . . 


. Lacon, 111. 




Mary Louise Cole . . 


Woonsocket, 111. . . 


61 


Gertrude I. Gleason . 


Council Bluffs, la. 


• • 57 


May E. Collins . . . 


Toledo, Ohio . 


13 


Alice M. Goodell . . 


Worcester, Mass. 


• ■ • 23 



(54) 



IRREGULARS. — Continued. 



NAMES. 

Mary E. Greenfield . . 
Grace L. Griffin . . . 
Katherine E. Hamilton . 
Mary P. Hanson .... 
Georgina L. Haskell . . 
Laura M. Hawes .... 
Lestra M. Hibberd . . . 
Alice L. Holmes .... 
Frances D. Holmes . . . 
Pearl I. Houston . . . 

June M. Hoyt 

Louise P. Hubbard . . . 
Lyday M. Hukill . . . 
Florence C. Hunsberger . 
Sarah H. Jacobus . . . 
Florence M. Kahn . . . 
Anna P. Kellogg . . . 
Sallie C. King .... 
Hilda Knowles .... 



RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 


Rochester, N.Y. 




Springfield, Mass. 


62 


Shreveport, La. . . 


22 


Chicago, 111. . . . 


53 


Chicago, 111. . . . 


22 


Delaware, Wis. 


37 


Richmond, Ind. . . 


44 


Willimantic, Conn. 


58 


Norristown, Penn. 


70 


Holyoke, Mass. 


61 


Seattle, Wash. 


70 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


26 


Pittsburgh, Penn. . . . 


'5 


New York City . . . 


54 


Auburndale, Mass. 




Cincinnati, Ohio. . 


Annex 


Chicago, 111 


18 


Chicago, 111 


3° 


Missoula, Mont. . . . 


1 1 



NAMES. 

Mary F. Lathrop 
Helen M. Loring 
Grace E. Loud 
Harriet Lewis 
A. Evelyn Mason 
Mary M. Miller . 
Helen B. Morris . 
Kate E. Norman . 
Bessie Phelps . . 
Edna M. Plummer 
Emma E. Porter . 
Ava F. Rawleigh 
M. Lucile Ray 
Florence Ray . . 
Grace A. Robinson 
Julia C. Ryan . . 
Mildred A. Sawyer 
Henrietta Schlim . 
M. Almena Seagrave 



RESIDENCES. ROOMS. 

Stafford Springs, Conn. . 67 
Newton Centre, Mass. 



Everett, Mass. . 
Urbana, Ohio . 
Auburn, Me. . . 
Bay City, Mich. 
Auburndale, Mass. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
Scranton, Penn. 
Portland, Me. . . 
Newton Centre, Mass 
Chicago, 111. . . 
Champaign, 111. 
Ottawa, Ont. . . 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
Davenport, la. . . 
Calais, Me. . . . 
Brooklyn, N.Y. . 
Toledo, Ohio . 



5i 

Annex 

47 
40 

. S. D. 

39 
33 

Annex 

9 
29 

37 
35 
5i 

63 
20 



(55) 



IRREGULARS. — Concluded. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCES. 


ROOMS. 






■ ■ 54 


Louise E. Seybolt . 


. Scranton, Perm. 


39 


Beulah H. Shannon 


. Medford, Mass. 


. . 8 


Florence L. Stedman 


. Needham, Mass. 


. . 20 


Helen J. Steel . . 


. Portland, Ore. . . 


• • 59 


Martha B. Stone 


. Omaha, Neb. . . 


• • 15 


Effie E. Symns . . . 


. Atchison, Kan. 


Annex 


Edith M. Taylor 


. Haverhill, Mass. . 


. . 14 


Lena M. Thayer . . 


. Holyoke, Mass. 


. . 6i 


Sarah D. Townsend 


. St. Joseph, Mo. 




Lillie S. Tukey . . 




. . 48 



Mary F. Tupper . . 
Louise J. Vance . . 
Kathleen E. Walpole 
Anna Walston . . . 
Josie H. West . . , 
Alice G. White . . . 
Emma L. White . . , 
Ruby L. Whitney . . 
Mary R. Wiggin . . , 
Estelle B. Wilcox . 
Florence C. Wyman 



RESIDENCES. ROOMS. 

Auburndale, Mass. 
. Urbana, Ohio .... 65 
. Kansas City, Mo. 

. Decatur, 111 58 

. Provincetown, Mass. . Annex 

Wethersfield, Conn. . . 77 
. Wethersfield, Conn. . . 77 

. Norwalk, Ohio S. D. 

. Maiden, Mass 60 

Clinton, Conn. . . . S. D. 
. Bangor, Me Town 




(56) 



\»f?er> Will the /llleplei be ©cat? 

Verb Sap. 

TS it riot erioilgri vexation, 
fir]d likewise tribulation, 

To get out a publication, 

Tnat TArtll rqeet tl\e approbation 

Of t^e critics of creation, 
Without ttie old interrogation, 
Wtiicn. 'Will drive to desperation, 
Even eds, of inspiration? 

Hs a bit of education 

To tnose seeding information, 

We i^ould rnaKe asseveration, 

Ti\at v^noe'er of tr\is bonn e rnaison 

Does but dare sucl} aggravation, 
Will receive just compensation- 
Feeling no cornrniseration, 
We shall bind our provocation, 

Drag l\er, fowling inqprecation, 

To tne elevator station, 

Wishing tier a good vacation, 

Drop n.er to Y\er destination- 

Do not laUgn at tt\is oration, 
'93 in desperation, 
May inflict rcvucu desolation, 
Not to say annihilation- 
(57; 



In UtemDriam. 



MAUDE LUTES, 

Class of 'q2, 
DIED JUNE, 1891. 



SUSIE KEITH, 

DIED NOVEMBER, 1891. 



NELLIE PATTERSON JACOBUS, 

DIED OCTOBER 26, 1891. 



GRACE T. RICHARDSON, 

DIED DECEMBER 10, 1891. 



(ss) 




/Irrl,;,, /•/,„ 



ka$ellm Club. 



ANNIE E. MASON 

MOLLIE ST. JOHN TAYLOR 

JUNE M. HOYT 

LENA M. THAYER . 

BESSIE PHELPS 

BESSIE L. EATON 

RUBY L. WHITNEY 

MARY TULLE YS 

ELLA M. EDDY 

Jennie M. Arnold. 

Gracia M. F. Barnhart. 
Alice M. Beaumont. 
Allie B. Brooks. 
Mary Brotherton. 

Sadie W. Burrill. 
Dorothy A. Chapman. 
Ellen A. Chase. 
Alice E. Cole. 
Nelle G. Davis. 
Edna M. Dice. 
Alice G. Donallan. 
Clara F. Eddy. 



Lottie C. Eddy. 
Mabel C. Falley. 
Elizabeth W. Fleming. 
Flora M. Gardner. 
Gertrude I. Gleason. 
Mary P. Hanson. 
Alice L. Holmes 
Pearl J. Houston. 
Anna P. Kellogg. 
Sallie C. King. 
Grace E. Loud. 
Mary M. Miller. 
Lucy S. Pinney. 



President. 
Fice- President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Critic. 
Guard. 

Executive Committee. 



Honoraiy Member 



Ava F. Rawleigh. 
Grace A. Robinson. 
Julia C. Ryan. 

Mildred A. Sawyer. 
Esther Scouller. 

Mary A. Seagrave. 
Louise E. Seybolt. 
Gertrude Sherman. 
Ida O. Short. 
Anna Staley. 
Edith M. Taylor. 
Carrie W. Van Sickle. 
Louise C. Whitney. 
HERBERT L. RICH. 



(60 



m^ 




fJrrh-fi /'lulu . 



S* D + ^ociety 



Founded 1877. 



desdemona millikin 
marie Mcdonald . 
lillie s. tukey 
anna e. crocker 
kate e. norman 
mae a. burr 
grace l. griff 



1 



Grace L. Allen. 
Julia W. Anderson. 
Alice Andreesen. 
Lottie F. Appel. 
Helen W. Boss. 
K. Belle Bragdon. 
Edna G. Burdick. 
Laura M. Case. 

Claire A. Chamberlin. 
Jessie I. Connell. 
Daisy E. Curtis. 

Mattie S. Deardorff. 
Louise M. Elwood. 
Honorary Members 



Clara B. Farquhar. 
Carolyn E. Gilman. 
Alice M. Good ell. 

Katherine E. Hamilton. 
Georgina L. Haskell. 
Lestra M. Hibberd. 
Julia E. Hogg. 
Frances Holmes. 



Lyday Hukill. 

Florence C. Hunsberger. 
Carrie B. Johnson. 
Harriet Lewis. 

Helen B. Medsker. 



President. 

Vice-Presiden t. 
Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Ushers. 

Ciitic. 

Lillie M. Packard. 
Mary Seaman. 

Rebecca C. Shepherd. 
Carrie L. Steel. 
Helen J. Steel. 
Mathe Stone. 
Louise J. Vance. 
Jessie F. Vilas. 
Anna Walston. 



Estelle B. Wilcox. 
Julia T. Wolfe. 
Virginia Wyckoff. 



MARTHA E. RANSOM, FLORENCE WELLS. 




<|). ID. <^o(<*ly Binned. 

JUNE 13, 1891. 

Mistress of Toasts, MAUD WHITNEY. 

TOASTS. 

Callers LUCY T^013ET$TS. 

Grinds SA%A HARVEY. 

Lasellia Club SUE T{ICHAT{DS. 

The Lasell Girl EMILY ROIVE. 

President's Address, Response, 

DESDEMONA milliken. Nan peabody. 



liareUu £loi jBa^ejOet. 



JUNE 6, 1891. 



President's Address, 

FLORA GARDNER. 



Old Girls 
Our Faculty . 
S. T>. Society 
Lasellia Club 



Toast Mistress, ALICE PLATT. 



TOASTS. 



EDITH GJILE. 
M% RICH. 
M<AUT> SUXYDE% 
MYT^A LtAMSOW.. 




^ 



(6 4 ) 



The First liasell Banquet 



CHICAGO, DECEMBER 28. 



HS a member of that august body, the Junior Class, of course one must write an article or do something 
for the Annual, and it must not only be something, but that something must be funny. So at the 
eleventh hour we grab our pens (take our pens in hand, we believe, is a more elegant expression, 
but our haste will not allow of our being elegant) and attempt to write something droll. We have heard of 
subjects that were not funny, but our editor-in-chief is inexorable. So we make a last desperate effort and 
write what our weary brains conceive as cute ; but, alas ! some way or other our readers do not get out all the 
brightness that is lurking in each sentence, aye, more than that, in each word. But to our subject. Could 
Bill Nye write anything laughable about that dignified of all dignified occasions, the banquet, and this the first 
Lasell banquet? We assure you it was no laughing matter, but a very solemn affair. It is something to be the 
originator of a great enterprise and to have the fate of nations on your hands. Chicago may well be proud. 
Her name connected with this event will be forever famous. When, do you ask, did this affair take place? 
It was on the afternoon of the twenty-eighth of December that thirty fair maids and a few equally fair matrons 
partook of a square meal in the Crystal Banquet Room of the Hotel Richelieu. We forgot to say that the 
" partaking " was accompanied by Valisi's Mandolin Orchestra, which, as the papers would say, discoursed sweet 
strains as the tempting viands were passed. We can't begin to tell in this short space of the wonderful things 
that took place, or just what we had to eat, for we must get to the toasts ; for this banquet was indeed " a 

(65) 



feast of reason and a flow of song." Our mistress of toasts was charming; when is she otherwise? — unless 
perhaps — No; I will not. I have decided not to tell here. I was only hired to write up the banquet. 
Well, where was I? I believe I had finished with the toast mistress, and will only add that she filled her role 
perfectly. And what shall I say of the brilliancy of the several responses to toasts ? Words fail me, — I 
positively cannot write what is in my heart, our language is so barren of words that fully express the fervor 
that at times is needed. The toasts finish all there is to tell about the banquet, and if this article should by 
any chance pass through the hands of our fun-desiring editor-in-chief and finally appear in '93's Annual, dear 
readers, do excuse on the plea that the writer is not a funny man. 






7VYeiNU 



" A feast prepared with riotous expense, much 
rust, more care, and most magnificence." 



oyjterj on half'jhell. 

Olivej. Celery. 

Tomato Joup. 

vscalloped l.objter. 

.Jweetbread Cro&uettej. Peas. Lettuce .Salad. 

Partridge. Trench Tried PotaToej. 

Ice Cream. Icej. Assorted Cakej. 

Coffee. 



(66) 



Toasts 



Toast Mistress, Miss CARPENTER, 
"Lead, and I follow." 



Tl\e Faculty EDITH GALE. 

" In thy wisdom make me wise." 

Tt\e R\un\r\ae Mrs. JUDD. 

" Follow, follow, thou shall vjin." 

Rerqiriisceqces Mrs. YHN HflRLINGEN. 

" The past -will always win a glory from its being far. ." 

Lasell Up to Date FLOR& M. GARDNER. 

•'Another year, ah, yes, another year." 

LooKir\g Forward EULft LEE. 

" What will the 20th century be? " 



td 



(6 7 ) 




J-fawkodakai Club* 



OFFICERS. 

CARRIE W. VAN SICKLE 
HERBERT L. RICH 



President. 
Manager. 



(6S) 




History of the Hauukodakai Club. 

P in one low garret, lighted by a tiny taper, four conspirators sat plotting mischief. One held pencil and 
paper while the others seemed to tell her what to write ; and after numerous " O's," and " Ahs," 
and " Let me see it," or, " Csesar ! won't they be raving when we snap them and hand them 
down to posterity?" they drew out a little black box, set it up, arranged themselves in a sort of 
picturesque group, and one grasped some kind of a rubber ball. In a minute there was a sort of report and 
flame and they all jumped up ; one gathered up the papers, another put under her shawl something which 
looked very like eatables, and followed by the last with the black box they all cautiously descended the stairs. 
They separated, each at her own door, with a whispered word, and disappeared. 

Next morning bright and early one of the maidens sallied forth to take her constitutional, and under her 
arm she carried a box very similar to the one of the night before. Promenading before the front of the 
building she cast her eye casually along the windows, when suddenly one was thrown up and a night-capped 
head peered out, unfastening and throwing back the blinds. Instantly, up went the black box and a click was 
heard, when with a sort of shriek in went the head, down went the window, likewise the curtain. " My, but 
won't the dear ' Parley ' tear her night-cap," sighed the maid, disconsolately. Just at this crisis girl number 
two and box number two came around the corner, and girl number two shouted, " Hi ! there, Teddy, got a 
joke on the Physics to tell you," and then followed an incoherent account: "Down by river-trees — morning 
row — one of our girls — Physics — touching landing scene — snapped the kodak on 'em — surprise party — joke — 
ha ! ha ! " 

The breakfast gong sounds, and with the most innocent manner they walk leisurely into the house, 
taking care to stow the boxes away under a heap of shawls. At breakfast they compare notes on the sly, and 
girl number four exclaims, " See if I don't get a bird's-eye view of Chumbly's wig to-day, for I'm most sure 
in this stiff breeze the two'll part company as he makes his semi-daily bolt for the train." But the other three 
exclaim, " Now, Betty, you know you're only fooling. Chumbly wouldn't be seen wearing anything not his own, 
and we won't believe anything else till you prove it." — "Well, anyway," chimed in three, "the girls are coming 
round and I've got a job in twenty-one to-night to jot down the feast, and I'll just use my persuasive powers 

(69) 



to the effect that if they don't stand by us when the trial comes and vote for the beloved camera, I'll expose 
every last one of them. That's fair. Shall we meet in our sanctum and compare notes after the feast?" They 
assent, and part for more absorbing duties. 

Midnight finds the four in the garret dashing around, and knocking into each other in their preparations. 
Soon a red glimmer shines forth and they all grow silent for a minute or two. Then Betty exclaims, " Didn't 
I tell you it was a wig? Here's proof positive, for I must have moved, and there are about forty flying about 
here in mid-air ; enough to get Chumbly's vote sure, for, in spite of all, his physiog.'s clear as day." 

" Oh, girls, come, look ! " breaks forth three ; " never mind if you do lose a plate, just look at this ! Did 
you ever see anything better? I believe you could tell the girls by their noses even, they're so plain;" and 
she held the plate before the light while the others gathered around to look. " Elegant ! how did you get such 
a good one?" — " My, but you've got them now, and if they tell on some of our larks — well, perhaps we 
haven't got another. I don't see how they ever agreed to ask you ; but wait, when they have such a scrumptious 
group to show around, self-interest will do the rest and they won't tell." 

" But, Sail, show us what you've got there ; 'tisn't fair to keep things the way you've been doing the 
last week," broke in four to two. " Don't get excited, dearie ; calm yourself, calm yourself, I say. I am just 
at a crisis, and in a minute I'll show you a poser that will make up for lost time. There, I guess that's fixed, 
if it ever will be ; and now for the bath, and then we shall see what we shall see. In the meantime, to ensure 
my own and the plate's safety, for I see rather a brigandish twinkle even by this dim light. Perhaps you have noticed 
my seeming scarcity on walking-days ; in fact, I think I remember quite distinctly a few sisterly remarks to 
that effect on one or two occasions. Well, I had a sort of plan ['You usually do,' from Betty], that, if 
worked out, would be rather more of an aid than hindrance to our worthy cause. Of course it is no secret 
between us that the little Fraulein Schmidt shows a decided preference for one of our town young men, which 
is very unseemly in so pretty and attractive a young woman, who, nevertheless, pretends to care about learning, 
and whose only care is, as I can see, to provide us with plenty of work ; so I thought if I might jot 
down a few little scenes by the aid of my ' enlightener,' perhaps you wouldn't object."— " Object ! you dear 
old thing!" broke in a chorus. "Just the thing. That'll be a climax to suit the word, and if that doesn't 
settle the case, we can look around for a case of a different sort. Go on ! hustle ! I'm dead to hear the 
rest." 

" Well," in a provokingly slow tone, " I thought walking-hour about as good a time as any, and followed 
out this plan for several successive days, and now I have a set of pictures representing almost every stage of 
development which (as the novels say) the great passion is likely to undergo, and to-day I got one which is 

(70) 



a pretty good one to end up with. I have them all here, and you can see what you think of them. But 
wasn't I scared, though ! Twice she has seen me, but I don't think it ever entered her head till to-day what 
I was up to, and when she heard the click — for I was pretty near, so as to get a fair representation of the 
kneeling performance — she flew around so quickly you couldn't distinguish one feature from another. Luckily I 
got out of her way till she cooled down, and then I told her I had her, and if she'd do her best to carry 
the vote for us in Faculty, I'd destroy the plates ; she calmed down and was humble as any suppliant. So 
I guess we're safe, and it'll go through." 

" Sail, you're a perfect darling ! we'll make you first president if we ever do get a club, won't we, 
girls?" exclaimed four. "Oh, but aren't those too ridiculous! just see the little fraulein playing the demure while 
he is all but on his knees ; you said truly when you called them a poser." 

" Come on, girls," called out Sail ; " don't look at those any more, but let's cultivate the inner man. I'm 
starved. This thing must succeed, for where will our lunches come in when our camera and case are gone? 
Dear old thing, what service you do render us ! " 

" There now, Sail, omit the pathetic, if it's just the same to you, and taste these olives. My, but they're 
good ! Yum ! yum ! " 

And so they have their lunch, and part for the night. The next day the eventful Faculty meeting comes 
off, and those four maids await the result with inward quakings, sidelong glances, and much sympathetic pressing 
of hands. But the hour in chapel arrives when it is formally announced that cameras are tabooed no longer, 

and that Prof. P will be prepared to give lessons in photography. In fact, it is thought best that a club 

be formed among the pupils, with the said professor at its head to direct the work and plan for excursions, 
field-days, etc. 

As soon as the session is dismissed our four friends are surrounded by a merry crowd who compliment 
them on their perseverance, and demand, "Which shall I get, a kodak or hawkeye? Which is yours, Betty? 
Does it take good pictures?" All of which questions the four laughingly answer, but soon they walk off together 
for a quiet little chat. " Well, it's all over," sighed Sail, " and I somehow wish it wasn't, for we won't have 
half so much fun now the fighting's all over; and our dear old meetings won't be any more, but we'll have 
to go down to that poky old dark room downstairs; and where will the lunches be?" 

" Not in it, that's sure, Sail ; but never mind, we can rack our brains now for a new missionary field. 
We'll have a club, anyhow; cheer up, old girl." 

And so our worthy Hawkodakai began ; let us hope it will continue with enough zest to pay for all the 
exertion of its interested founders. 

(70 



Christian Associations. 



•••^>S^h^S^-* 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY- 



SADIE W. BURRILL . 
MABEL C. FALLEY 
ALICE E. COLE . 
MRS. W. T. SHEPHERD 
NELLIE M. RICHARDS 
LILLIE M. PACKARD 
ANNA STALEY 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Executive Committee. 



SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR. 



JULIA E. HOGG 
ALICE E. COLE 
LOUISE P. HUBBARD 
M. ALMENA SEAGRAVE 
JESSIE F. VILAS . 
EMMA L. WHITE 
GRACE L. GRIFFIN 
JENNIE M. RICH 
MILDRED C. WARREN 
CARRIE E. BATCHELDER 
ALICE G. WHITE 
ELLA SHELDON 



President. 
Vice- Pre siden t. 
Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
Treasurer. 

Lookout Committee . 

Music. 

Prayer Meetings. 

Missions. 

Temperance. 



(72) 







^> 



Drsss Gutting 



JENNIE M. ARNOLD. 

GRACE L. GRIFFIN. 

KATHERINE E. HAMILTON. 
BESSIE PHELPS. 




(7.?) 




rf^"~ - (■ 



THE ONLY SURVIVOR. 



Ground Manager 



JOSEPH A. HILLS. 



(74) 



SWIMMSRS. 



AGNES F. ALDRICH. 
JENNIE M. ARNOLD. 
HELEN W. BOSS. 
MARGARET D. BRODRICK. 
SADIE W. BURRILL. 



L. MABEL CASE. 
ELLEN A. CHASE. 
UNA COLE. 

FRANCES B. DAVENPORT. 
CARRIE H. DOLE. 
BESSIE L. EATON. 
LOUISE M. ELWOOD. 
ELIZABETH W. FLEMING. 
JESSIE M. GASKILL. 
MARY P. HANSON. 
GEORGINA L. HASKELL. 
LESTRA M. HIBBERD. 
ALICE L. HOLMES. 
FRANCES D. HOLMES. 
MISS HOWARD. 



SARAH D. TOWNSEND. 
CARRIE W. VAN SICKLE. 
ELIZA H. WARREN. 
MISS WILSON. 
MRS. WINSLOW. 



JUNE M. HOYT. 
LOUISE P. HUBBARD. 
LYDAY M. HUKILL. 
MISS HUNT. 
SALLIE H. JACOBUS. 
MISS JEWETT. 
FLORENCE M. KAHN. 
HELEN B. MEDSKER. 
ALICE NOBLE. 
HARRIET NOBLE. 
BESSIE PHELPS. 
LUCILE M. RAY. 
MILDRED A. SAWYER. 
FLORENCE L. STEDMAN. 
EFFIE E. SYMNS. 



(75) 



#^« 



Prices, 1S91. 



® 



/V/0 TO GRAPH Y. 

Carrie W. Van Sickle . . . First Prize. 
BERTIE BURR ... . . Second Prize. 

READING. 



Maud M. Baldwin. 

MILITARY DRILL^ 

Mary Blanche Busell .... First Prize. 
Maude E. Whitney .... Second Prize. 

GYMNASTICS. 
NELLIE M. TAFT. 

BR EA D-MA K ING . 

HELEN BOULLT MEDSKER . . . First Prize. 
SUSANNE S. Baker .... Second Prize. 

(76) 



UHS>&UU ^HWWRUlOTi. 



OFFICERS. 



DESDEMONA MILLIKIN 
SYBIL H. SPAULDING 



Acting Major. 
Acting Adjutant. 



Company A. 

Captain. 

REBECCA C. SHEPHERD. 

Lieutenant. 

SYBIL H. SPAULDING. 

Sergeants. 

CLARA F. EDDY. BESSIE PHELPS. 

Corporals. 
LOUISE C. WHITNEY. MARY M. MILLER. 



Company B. 

Captain. 

HELEN B. MEDSKER. 

Lieutenant. 
K. BELLE BRAGDON. 

Sergeants. 
JULIA W. ANDERSON. MARY TULLEYS. 

Corporals. 
LILLIE S. TUKEY. JULIA T. WOLFE. 



Company C. 

Captain. 

DESDEMONA MILLIKIN. 

Lieutenant. 

CAROLYN E. OILMAN. 

Sergeants. 

LOTTIE C. EDDY. LOTTIE F. APPEL. 

Corporals. 
MOLLIE ST. JOHN TAYLOR. ANNIE E. MASON. 

(78) 




A look — Before and After. 



BEWITCHING are Lasell's fair girls, 
When in drill suits they are dressed, 
With jaunty caps on dainty curls, 
Then they are at their very best. 
'Tis alarming, 
Though very charming. 

Hear the command! 'Forward, fours right!" 

"By right flank!" or "To the rear, — march! 
Did you ever see so pretty a sight? 

Or ever see captains and soldiers so arch? 
No, never! 
Nor will you ever! 

Oh, 'tis all very well — indeed, 'tis quite fine — 

For maidens to learn how to drill ; 
For Rosie and Fan to march into line, 
As well as for Harry or Will. 
'Tis well, in school, 
To learn military rule. 



But, alas ! when the girl's a wife, 

The husband leads a stormy life. 
Captain's a part she loves to play 

From eventide to dawn of day. 
"The baby, John, to arms!" she cries, 
And the wailing infant in them lies. 
So must he rise, 
To sing lullabies. 

Now, "Forward, march!" he next must obey. 

The infant's wails he too must soothe. 
She, sleep enjoys till break of day, 

While her poor husband's on the move. 
She — in repose, 
He — -marching goes. 
A fine cigar 

He fain would smoke, 
But, no, 'tis "Halt!" 
And it's no joke. 



(79) 



One eve to the theatre he will go, 
With a dear chum of former years, 

To see the latest thing, a fine new show. 
But, alas, what vision now appears ! 

A voice in accents too well known 

Resounds just as he nears the place, 
And "Hark!" in a commanding tone, 
"Left! left! left! Right about face!" 
This she utters ; 
And though he mutters, 
He can not stay. 
Who saw the play ? 

The swell Mrs. Jonathan K. Brown 

Makes her inaugural call, 
Dressed in a fine new Paris gown 

That would grace Boston's mall. 



But before she's ushered in 

The husband is on the marching flank, 
For the order has been, 

"To the rear — march! Into rank!" 

And thus he goes from morn to eve ; 

And thus Eve makes him go. 
'Tis all very well, don't you believe? 

Truly, don't you think so ? 

But this he vows — 

"My daughter fair 
May make fine bows, 

Sing, dance, and curl her hair; 

'But the lance, the sword, and gun, 

For a girl are no fun. 
No, never should she 

A soldier-girl be." 




(So) 





Published every month throughout the School Year, 'by a Board of Editors elected once in three months. 



First f<TO- 

NELLIE M. RICHARDS 



Editor, 



Associate Editors. 
ALICE G. DONALLAN. JESSIE F. VILAS. 

HELEN B. MEDSKER. 
MABEL C. FALLEY. ALMA R. HUBBARD. 

Subscription Agent. 
MOLLIE TAYLOR. 



5eeoQd Jer/TV 

JENNIE M. ARNOLD Editor. 

Associate Editors. 
LAURA M. CASE. JUNK M. HOYT. 

GERTRUDE SHERMAN. 
EVA L. COUCH. CLARA F. EDDY. 

Subscription. Agent. 
GEORGIANNA F. ADAMS. 

FLORA M. GARDNER 



Editor. 



Jl?ird Jerm. 

JENNIE M. ARNOLD 

Associate Editors. 

MARY F. TUPPER. FRANCES B. DAVENPORT. 

HELEN B. MORRIS. 

VIRGINIA WYCKOFF. ALICE NOBLE. 

Subscription Agent. 
(1RACE L ALLEN. 



Publisher. 



(Si) 




xt^t UP IB 




ALICE ANDREESEN. 
HELEN W. BOSS. 
MAE A. BURR. 
MARIE BROTHERTON. 



ELLEN A. CHASE. 
MAUDE W. CLARK. 
ALICE E. COLE. 
MARY E. COLLINS. 



CARRIE B. JOHNSON. 
ANNIE P. KELLOGG. 
SALLIE C. KING. 
HARRIET NOBLE. 



EDNA M. PLUMMER. 
AVA F. RAWLEIGH. 
L. MABEL SAWYER. 
ESTHER SCOULLER. 
CARRIE W. VAN SICKLE. 

(S2) 





"There swims no goose so gray but, soon or late, 
She finds some honest gander for a mate." 



■#••••[£ 



Grace Ackerly 



Leah Coitts 



Winnie B. Ewing 



Lillie E. Hathaway . 



Nettie Keener 



Nellie H. Packard 



Louise Walston 



Mrs. N. Kerr. 
Carrie M. Brown 

. Mrs. W. P. Anderson. 
Helen M. Dodds 

Mrs. N. E. Coffin. 
Sara B. Harvey . 

. Mrs. R. D. Muir. 
Julia P. Hubbard 

. Mrs. Edson Keith. 
Augustine M. Lowe 

Mrs. J. R. Draper. 
Hat tie Van Cisc . 

Mrs. Percival Chubb. 



Mary O. Beach . . . Mrs. T. F. Schneider. 

. Mrs. R. T. Cassell. 
Anne E. Crawford . . . Mrs. J. M. Hawkhurst. 

Mrs. P. H. Sternbergh. 
Allie Gardner .... Mrs. E. J. Rogers. 

. Mrs. Chas. W. McChesney. 
Edith Hax .... Mrs. E. C. Hartwig. 

Mrs. W. I. Kelly. 
Ada Z. Langley . . . Mrs. F. H. Briggs. 

Mrs. H. M. Brownbank. 
Laura E. Pciv . . . Mrs. D. A. Somes. 

. Mrs. David Youngs. 
Lucile Wyard .... Mrs. A. A. Newbery. 



Note. — Some of those who have found one since our last Annual was published. 

(S3) 



Senior Statistics. 



"To THOSE WHO KNOW THEE NOT, NO WORDS CAN PAINT! 

And those who know thee, know all words are faint." — Hannah More. 



NAME. 


Nick- 
names. 


Age. 


Weight 

in 
Braiit . 


Height* 


Noses. 


Eyes. 


"3 


Tempera- 
ment. 


Nation- 
ality. 


Am. 
bit ion. 


Favorite 

Occu- 
pation. 


Favorite 
Author. 


Engaged? 


Sade Burrill .... 


Suddie. 


Very 
young-. 


As yet 
undevel- 
oped. 


m 


Stepping 
heaven- 
ward. 


Can't tell. 
Never 
open. 


1 


Not 
formed. 


Sham.- 
rock. 


Grow 
length- 
wise. 


Sweet 

sleep. 


Daniel 
Quorm. 


To be 
sure! 




Alicia. 


2 


Average. 


The 

most be- 
coming. 


Has one. 


2 there. 


2 


Frisky. 


Dutch. 


Get 

through. 


Dancing. 


Anon. 


Pray 
excuse me. 




Teddy. 


Just 17. 


34 oz. 


S ft-. 4 in- 


A solid 
affair. 


Hazel. 


3 


Interest- 
ing. 


Thor- 
oughly 
American 


To be- 
come 
B.Sc. 


Recitations 
in 7. 


Has none. 


Maybe. 


Alice Donallan . . 


Little 
Don. 


Dimin- 
ishing. 


Too 

light to 
weigh. 


A huge 
specimen. 


Inquisi- 
tive. 


Rolling. 


4 


Depends on 
company. 


Cosmo- 
politan. 


Get 
married. 


Talking. 


Editor of 
Lampoon. 


Now or 
never. 


Mabel Falley . . . 


Queen 
Mab. 


Sweet 
sixteen. 


Burden- 
some. 


36 in. 


„ . Beseech- 
Grecian. ] ing _ 


S 


Coy. 


Scotch. 


To teach. 


Author- 
ship. 


Duchess. 


No!! 


Desdemona Millikin, 


Desdie. 


Just 
right. 


Varies. 


High as 
his heart. 


Irish. 


Pre- 
engaged. 


6 


Moody. 


" later. 


Cross 
the sea. 


Meditation. 


Tennyson. 


Yes. 


Anna Staley .... 


Staley 
Ann. 


76 
summers. 

Variable. 


Can it be 
weighed? 


Not worth 
mention- 
ing. 


Right for 
specs. 


Tempt- 
ing. 


7 


Highly 
excitable. 


Esqui- 
maux. 


Go into 
business. 


Visiting 
linen room. 


Adam 
Smith. 


Not in my 
line. 


Jessie Vilas .... 


Viley. 


O 


Fair to 
middling. 


Ordi- 
nary. 


Nile 
green. 


S 


So-so. 


Spanish. 


To pass 
in Bible. 


Consulting 
Ouija. 


Never read. 

Bad lor 

eyes. 


No'one 
wants me. 


Mary Witherbee . 


Withers. 


No one 
knows. 


200 lbs. 


Too 

rapid 
growth. 


Learned. 


Pre- 
occupied. 


9 


Grinding. 


Swabian.f 


Be Pres. 

of 
"Sorosis" 


Theatre- 
going. 


[enness- 
Miller. 


Horrors ! 


Julia Wolfe .... 


Julila. 


So very 
old! 


Nothing 
there. 


Hop 0' 

my 
thumb. 


Quite 
promi- 
nent. 


Old 

blue. 


10 


Refined, 
as by fire. 


Like 
Topsy's. 


Be a post- 
graduate. 


Flirting. 


Cruden. 


Six 
or more. 



* As she thinks it. 



f A Swabian does not become developed till forty. 
(84) 







1h 


® 


s 


acreb ® 

TO THE 


Memory 


of 92's Annual, 






WHICH 




DIED 


IN ITS INFANCY. 


'"Baby, 


thou 


art gone to rest, 


Thy 


pains 


and sufferings o'er, 


Thou 


'eft a 


vacant place down here, 


The 


cause 


of misery sore." 



(Ss) 




GookiriQ Glasses. 

THIRD YEAR. 

JULIA W. ANDERSON. NELLE G. DAVIS. 

JENNIE M. ARNOLD KATHERINE E. HAMILTON. 

SADIE W. BURRILL. DESDEMONA MILLIKIN. 

ALICE E. COLE. WILLIE A. STOWE. 



SPECIALS. 

FRANCES B. DAVENPORT. 
ALICE G. DONALLAN. 
MARY F. LATHROP. 

(86) 




L 



ASELL maids must learn to cook, 

Lasell maids use the Lincoln book, 
Lasell maids can bake a pie, 
Men who eat it probably die. 

Last year Mrs. Oakes was teacher. 
Wonder if our words will reach her. 
Long recipes she made us learn, 
Till we swore her book to burn. 

Every pan she made us clean. 
Don't you think she acted mean? 
Brush and dust and wash up fine, 
Ere the bell called us to dine. 

On ourselves we needs must wait, 
From arrival till we sate, 
At the dinner gaily spread, 
Roast, coffee, cake, and bread. 



But this year we have a snap, 
We recline on luxury's lap : 
A recipe we ne'er commit, 
As if none were ever writ. 

Wash the dishes? Oh, my, no ! 
Uirty them by hundreds, though ; 
Indeed, Miss Nicholls is a trump, 
That's our 'pinion in a lump. 

We can choose what we will make, 
Bread, pie, salad, buns, or cake. 
We run the class, she plays the maid, 
Thus in a nutshell it is said. 

To Miss Nicholls a long life. 

May she be a happy wife ! 

May she shed such brightness round, 

Always, as this year we've found ! 



(87) 




MUSIC 





Piarp-forte Quartettes, 



o>azc 



K. BELLE BRAGDON. 
KATHERINE E. HAMILTON. 
LOTTIE F. APPEL. 

MARY M. MILLER. 

LENA M. THAYER 

LAURA M. CASE. 

ELLA M. EDDY. 
GERTRUDE I. GLEASON 
MARY A. SEAGRAVE. 
GERTRUDE SHERMAN. 
RUBY L. WHITNEY. 



SADIE W. BURRILL. 
CLARA F. EDDY. 
MILDRED C. WARREN. 
NELLIE M. RICHARDS. 





ANNA E. 


CROCKER. 




MARY F. 


TUPPER. 




LOTTA J. 


, PROCTOR 




MARY L. 


COLE. 









(9°) 




^ }]m 



Lasell Quartette, 



o^c 



JULIA C. RYAN 
MAY TULLEYS 
MARY SEAMAN 
EDNA M. DICE 



First Soprano. 
Second Soprano. 
First Alto. 
Second Alto. 




(90 



^TVIKAM Ci^ 




Grace L. Allen. 
Julia W. Anderson. 
Jennie M. Arnold. 

Gracia M. F. Barnhart. 
Margaret D. Brodrick. 
Edna G. Burdick. 
Mae A. Burr. 
Dorothy A. Chapman. 
Alice E. Cole. 
M. Louise Cole. 
Jessie I. Connell. 
Edna M. Dice. 

Alice G. Donallan. 

J- 



Daisy G. Earle. Julia C. Ryan. 


Clara F. Eddy. 


Harriett G. Scoti'. 


Clara B. Farquhar. 


Mary Seaman. 


Flora M. Gardner. 


Ida Short. 


Gertrude I. Gleason. 


Anna Staley. 


Grace L. Griffin. 


Florence L. Stedman 


Florence C. Hunsberger. 


Edith M. Taylor. 



Alice L. Holmes. 
Grace E. Loud. 
Kate E. Norman. 
Bessie Phelps. 

Nellie M. Richards. 
Grace A. Robinson. 

WALTER DAVIS 

(92) 



LlLLIE S. TUKEY. 

Mary Tulleys. 
Emma L. White. 
Ruby L. Whitney. 
Estelle B. Wilcox. 



Conductor. 




G. B. O. QUEEN. 




SWEET STRAINS OF MUSIC. 



Sweet strains of music broke upon my ears, 
Lifting me up to where on trackless "way, 
Exulting in the light ol heaven-born day, 
In rhythmic harmony still roll the spheres. 
Weird strains ol music smote upon my ears, 
Throbbing and struggling on impassioned strings, 



As when at night the bird of sorrow sings 

And every flower grows tearful as it hears. 

And then the notes grew loud, and wild, and long, 

Then ebbed to moan like wind among the trees, 

Or whisper tenderly in pleadings sweet, 

Then died in laughter like a naiad's song. 



Slowly I roused me from my reveries — 
An organ man was going down the street. 

(95) 




Junior Entertainment 



March 19, 1892. 



-•OCX- 



NONE SO DEAF AS" THOSE WHO WONT HEAR. 



Farce in One Act. 



Singleton Coddle . 
Washington Whitwell . 
Eglantine Coddle 
Ja?ie Smith . 



Cast. 



Eva Couch. 

Louise Whitney. 

Marie Brotherton. 

Margaret Brodrick. 



s 

X 



WHEN GREEK MEETS GREEK. 



A Comedietta in 2 Acts and 2 Scenes. (By J. K. Jerome.) 



Dramatis Person/e 



Mi'. Schoefield 
Tom Aklatid . 
Mrs. Schoefield 
Etta Winning-ham 



Ida Short. 

. Nelle Davis. 

Nellie Richards. 

Flora Gardner. 




(06) 




Clhss ••• Dmv. 



JUNE 15, 1891, 

oaa 



Piano-forte Quartette . Misses Sargeant, Shellabarger, Thresher, Johnson 
President' 's Address .......... Nan S. Peabody 

Address by Honorary Member 



Piano-forte 
Class History 
Guitar 
Prophecy 
Class Rhymes 
Piano-forte 

Recitation — An Idyl of the Periods n '' T 

J \ Part Two. J 

Vocal Solo ....... 

Charge to 'g2 ....... 

Class Song ....... 



William J. Rolfe. 

Nellie Johnson. 

. Susan C. Richards. 

Maude C. Snyder. 

Sara B. Harvey. 

Nettie F. Woodbury. 

Helen H. Thresher. 

Marie Shellabarger. 

Nan S. Peabody. 

Lucy H. Roberts. 

Plaved bv Lucy E. Sargeant. 



LAWN EXERCISES. 

Oration — Planting of the Tree . Jessie A. Benton. 

Elegy — Burning of the Books ....... Susanne S. Baker. 

Effigy Sarah M. Winsor. 

Valedictory, June 17, EFF1E M. PRICKETT. 

(98) 



©lass I^hyn^es. 



OF all the learned maidens that compose our senior class, 
The one who strikes my fancy the very first, alas ! 
Is a maiden from Chicago, whom the god of love ensnared, 
When she was for his awful dart entirely unprepared. 
But ever since the fatal day the accident took place, 
She's diligently practised on contortions of the face, 
Till now she boasts most proudly, not of the way she dances, 
But of the awful power embodied in her glances. 
One awful glance of anger on him accused of guilt — 
The poor offending mortal has nought to do but wilt. 

That's Sara. 

Before I go much further there's something I must say: 
If you want to see a funny sight just call around this way 
Some evening when we're swimming and watch a senior grave; 
To see her frantic efforts to keep above the wave. 
She likes to know what's going on, and in her zeal to hear, 
She lets her lower jaw drop ten inches, there, or near. 
But another theory's been advanced which sets this matter right : 
She really cannot close her mouth, she curls her hair so tight. 

That's Lucy. 



Of the earth's most giddy creatures, with a giggle all her own, 
Our patriarch with her cuckoo smile most surely stands alone. 
She is a loving, social soul; but when she's to us talking, 
She calls us by our surname:- in a manner truly shocking. 
She's tried among her classmates the seeds of good to sow, 
And on the temperance question her words most surely flow ; 
But soon she'll leave the barren field, and hopes to make her 

home 
On the shining sands of heathen strands, where the cannibals 

do roam. 

That's Jessie. 

You have heard of pious maidens with their quiet saintly ways, 
Whose meek and sweet demeanor is everybody's praise. 
We have a maiden in our class, she's these virtues hard to find, 
But, alas! when once you know her, she's just the other kind. 
She persists in wearing demis, which are here an awful crime, 
And every Sunday morning she spends most of her time 
In pinning up her garment, till, with a Grecian bend, 
She prances by the teachers ; the rest they upstairs send. 

That's Maude. 



(99) 



It really seems most touching that our class should be afflicted 
With two such base deceivers as I have just depicted ; 
But we have another classmate whose virtues are the same ; 
But, alas! iust like the other, they're only so in name. 
The strangest thing about her is, she really thinks it's fit, 
In chapel, when the others rise, that she alone should sit. 
And she's such a sense of humor, that she marks a joke with " j," 
So she'll be sure to see it, if she reads the book some day. 

That's Effie. 

Sometimes, while walking through the halls, you hear an awful 

groan. 
It is enough to freeze your blood and turn you into stone. 
Should you then but approach the door, although with fear 

you're mute, 

You'll find the smallest of the wasps trying to elocute. 

But, oh! the strangest thing of all, it seems so very queer, 

That the very youngest maiden in two phases should appear; 

She comes down in the morning with six hairs tied with a bow, 

But when evening comes, she's thick black locks. Do you know 

why it's so? 

That's Marie. 

Sometimes one member of our class — she's very, very small- 
Becomes so very obstinate she won't recite at all, 
But when she isn't in the mood, it is a funny sight 
To watch her preparations to give the answer right. 
She looks directly into space, with a funny little frown, 
And then for three full minutes she playeth with her gown, 
Then suddenly she looketh up, droopeth her mouth down low, 
And with a vacant smile she says, " I do not think I know." 

That's Daisy. 

(too) 



Quite often in our four years' course, divertisements have come, 
Such as junior entertainments (on this subject I am dumb). 
But whatever has arisen she'll say in greatest glee, 
This thing would not have turned out well, had it not been 

for me ; 
Or if a man comes to this place — a circumstance not rare — 
This enterprising maiden most surely will be there, 
And while the other students with jealousy are green, 
She, sweetly smiling, babbles on and leads him off the scene. 

That's Lu. 



Behold our pride, our model of what a girl should be; 
She mixes up a loaf of bread as if 'twere A, B, C, 
And altho' it comes out freckled and considerably depressed, 
Yet she will surely get the prize, for it far excels the rest. 
Then she speaks the purest English, she even rivals me. 
Just ask her where her home is, "It's deown in Tennessee." 
But she blushes so terrificly if any one at her looks, 
That we had to put her near the fire to superintend the cooks. 

That's Susie. 



Another of our classmates strides with such sylph-like grace, 
That among us clumsy mortals she seems quite out of place. 
She's such a contrary creature, that I've really heard them say. 
That on sword-drill exhibitions she'll go the other way. 
And another thing about her, she's so careful of her health 
That while her room-mate's sleeping she ambles out by stealth, 
And promenades the sidewalk in sunshine and in rain, 
To watch her namesake hurry by to take the Boston train. 

That's Susanne. 



But speaking of politeness, I know you'll not believe it, 
But then you must consider from what source you receive it. 
We have an officer in the drill, who's really so polite 
That she always says "beg pardon "when an order is not right. 
Whene'er she's saying something you have a constant fear, 
Because her voice's so soft and low, that something you'll not hear. 
She always takes her morning walk for fear that she'll be ill. 
I thought at first I'd tell his name, but I hardly think I Will. 

That's Nan. 

We've had most varied characters presented to our view, 

But the bashful ones have been left out, and of this class we 

have two ; 
But I'll not describe this maiden, nor will I give her age, 
For you surely will discover her on looking round the stage. 
But there's one thing I have noticed throughout our course of years, 
That this maid is not so modest nor so mild as she appears, 
For every Sunday morning, when into church we file, 
A blonde young man precedes her while going up the aisle. 

That's Nellie. 



Most all of us take German, it is our chief delight, 
But one on conversation is up, clear out of sight. 
On almost every school day this question greets the ear : 
2Ba3 Ijaben bu fiir geftetn ? (The meaning is quite clear.) 
And then in recitations, 'tis really most sublime' 
To watch her shrewd manoeuvres for the sake of gaining time. 
When asked a sudden question — and 'tis really quite an art — 
To say in tones most fetching, " I learned the other part." 

That's Helen. 



Of all these reverend seniors there still remains one more, 
And she's the other bashful one of whom I spoke before. 
She's always full of trouble, her duties never done, 
Still she persists in going out and joining in the fun. 
But now a fear possesses her, it drives her nearly wild, 
That on the morrow she will be a lone, forsaken child, 
Lest all the angry seniors against her should conspire, 
And send her oft" to Coventry to mitigate their ire. 

That's me. 




(101) 



GLA.HSS SQDG 



Allegretto. 



MOTTO: " To thine own self be true!" 

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JBUfvi 




Miahaps of tr]s '93's. 

" Never class meant so well, and fared so ill, in this disastrous world." 

k O not think that you have to read a second history of the class of '93, and turn aside from the poor 
recollections of a Junior with a mere cursory glance. 

I shall not trespass upon the province of the class historian, but relate a few of the minor details 
which would either escape her eye or would not be regarded of enough consequence to be recorded in the 
history of our illustrious class. Only I would have all those who might consider the reputation of the class 
injured by the mere fact that misfortunes sometimes fell to its lot, understand from the very beginning that the 
recital of these mishaps implies no discredit to the class of '93. 

These misfortunes began to fall upon us in our Sophomore year, and originated in the physics class. From 
the first time that the members of that class set foot upon the learned and odorous soil of the laboratory they 
felt the presence of an obstacle which they could neither conquer nor evade. " All hope abandon, ye who enter 
here," seemed to be inscribed upon every available space, and if it had not been " that many have and others 
must sit there, and in this thought they find a kind of ease," there would be no one left to tell the tale. 

Tests followed one another in rapid succession, and knowledge, instead of entering, seemed to leave the 
heads of those who had chosen science for an elective. Soon it became evident that this condition of things 
could exist no longer. Hourly consultations were held in the hall, scraps of which fell upon the ears of the 
bystanders, — "Last year's class had just as much trouble;" "Went to the principal three times;" "No right to 
say we can't pass;" and "What shall we do?" It was finally decided that to beard the lion in his den would 
be the most courageous, if not the most expedient, thing to do. Upon reaching the den it was found to be 

(105) 



empty, and the invited guests were about to beat a hasty retreat when they were suddenly confronted by the 
"wee, cow'rin', tim'rous beastie " himself, which sudden apparition so startled the spokeswoman that her last bit of 
courage deserted her, and she could only gasp, " Mr. liberty, are you at Rich?" Now, this not being in her 
role, the others were plunged in the direst confusion, each one forgetting her part, and the carefully planned 
discussion became a mere incoherent burst, and the result? — A review of electricity that friction might be used 
to " rub each other's angles down." 

When we were promoted to chemistry our trials were increased, for our nervy professor became nervous. 
All conversation in the laboratory was forbidden, for it was found to be " very annoying." Soon his condition 
became so pitiable that the mere squeaking of a chair would cause the class to be excused for the afternoon. 
At last, finding that distance lends enchantment to the view, he was wont to seek refuge in the dark-room at 
three o'clock, and would emerge at five, when the class was excused. 

During her second year, one who is now an honored member of the Junior class would regularly lock 
herself into G. and then wait for her classmates in the most piteous manner. After being rescued several times 
by those noble friends, and upon the last occasion being obliged to scale a huge partition, she resolved never to 
frequent such places again. 

One evening wishing to resume the careless happiness, together with the infantile appearance, of their 
Freshman days, two of the members came down to the chapel with their hair braided in two pig-tails, tied with 
beautifully contrasting ribbons. Why they were reprimanded, and told that if they were ever again " overcome 
by similar feelings," they might consider themselves excused from chapel exercises, will always remain one of the 
mysteries which hover around the Junior class. 

But the worst of the mishaps may be elegantly entitled the " Premediated Bum." Such it was not, but 
as such it was taken. It was occasioned by the visit of one Junior to another, of a Sunday evening. There 
had been some little trouble between the two during the afternoon, and the hostess fearing that she was to be 
locked into her room, as she had locked her classmate into her's, took the precaution to abstract the key from 
the door, turning the lock as she did so, little dreaming what the result would be. There were two other guests 
present, a Sophomore and a Special, and the four thought to give themselves up to an hour of unadulterated 
happiness. But, alas! they forgot that "the most excellent thing in woman is a low and well-modulated voice" — 

(106) 



and the transom was open, Soon the well-known rap of one who has been known to announce herself as "the 
same old party " was heard, and upon the hearing each one chanted wearily 

" No longer I follow a sound, 
No longer a dream I pursue, 
A happiness not to be found, 
Unattainable treasure, adieu." 

And then a tremulous voice said " Come," but only a rattling of the knob acknowledged the invitation. The 
door was locked and the key gone, the hostess having mislaid it in her excitement. A panic ensued, which was 
not lessened by the fact that the fumbling at the door did not cease. When the key was finally found the 
door was opened just in time for the newcomer to get a good view of the head of the scared Sophomore 
protruding from the closet. This, together with the effective arrangement of the hair, and graceful folds of 
the bath gowns of the others, so charmed the visitor that she could only murmur "Follow me!" Now the four 
were not inclined to follow, but as they could not long withstand the pleading invitation they followed, — to 
No. 3. They suffered untold agonies of a two-hours' imprisonment; they departed — sadder and wiser maidens, 
who "never speak as they pass by" when they meet on Sunday evening. 

Now these are only a few of the many mishaps which befell the '93 's ; there were many more, a few on 
account of the "naturally loud " voices of some of the members, as many on the "inexcusably" weak voices of 
others. 

But in spite of all this the Junior class still survives, and holds itself in continual readiness for any 
mishaps which may chance to come upon it at this late hour, though the thirteenth day of April was not too 
late for the Faculty to discover that there were those in the Junior class who, by lacking one or more studies 
could not be counted full-fledged Juniors, thereby shutting out some who had worked the hardest for the Annual, 
and causing a temporary embarrassment. But " we've screwed our courage to the sticking point, and we'll not fail." 



(107) 




J ■/.- 



THIS is the village of Auburndale. 
This is the feminine rival of Yale, 
That sits in the village of Auburndale, 
At whose rising fame let Harvard grow pale. 

This is the girl with dotted veil, 
Who came by canal-boat, stage, and rail 
To this fair feminine rival of Yale, 
That sits in the village of Auburndale. 

These are the lads that never fail 

To call on the girl with the dotted veil, 



Who came by canal-boat, stage, and rail 
To study (?) in beautiful Auburndale. 

These are the hours — ah, "don't you know!" — 

So tardy in coming, so swift to go, 

When all those lads who never fail 

To call on the girl with dotted veil 

May sit in the parlor a little while 

To chat, and giggle, and cough, and smile 

With that fair damsel, who, dressed in style, 

" Entertains her friends," sans gush, sans guile, 



(10S) 



In the elegant parlors of Auburndale, 
The resplendent rival of poor old Yale. 

These are the maidens, demureness all, 

The thin, the fat, the short, the tall, 

Who station themselves, a curious row, 

To see the poor faint hearts ask at the doo — 

R (with frantic dive into pockets deep, 

Where their cigarettes, candy, and cards they keep) 

For the lovely maid with the dotted veil. 

How they stammer and blush, and anon grow pale ! 

And each fair watcher goes mad with glee 
At thought of the fun that is to be, 

When, all forgetting the cast-iron rule 

Of visiting-hours at this " girls' school," 

The innocent youths stay on and on 

When the clock in the tower has said, "Begone! 

Tis 5, 'tis 5, 'tis 5, 'tis 5; 

You could stay no longer, were you the khe- 

dive ! " 



Then loud thro' the hall the dreadful clang, 
The crash, the rattle, the whiz, the bang, 
Of that old gong whose battered face 
The watching maidens with gleeful grace 
Pound upon at a lively pace. 

This is the scene that meets your eyes 
When the lads recover from their surprise. 
Of all sad words beneath the sun 
The saddest are these, "We had to run!' 

This is the lady, famed of yore, 
Whose eyes smile madness, and wrath, and gore 
On the dot-veiled maid who goes to the door 
With the tender youth of charms galore, — 
This is she, and her office floor 
Reeks with the tears of the wretched maid, 
Scoffed at, scorned, and sore afraid, 
When, thrilling her through to her dear heart's 
core, 



(109) 



The lady informs her, " I am the more 

Astonished that you should forget the rule. 

Never — and let me make this plain — 

To door or station, in shine or rain, 

Accompany callow youths who call ; 

Nor fathers, nor mothers — include them all." 

Meekly penitent maid appears. 

Gay and jovial and void of fears 

Is the real state of her youthful breast ; 



Gravely dismissed, she hums as she goes, 
"Oh, how full is this world of woes!" 

Night crowns with shadows sweet Auburndale, 
Deepens to darkness o'er hill and vale ; 
And this fair feminine rival of Yale, 
With her precious freight of maidens frail, 
Dreamily nods, nor is wakened at all 
By the cat on the back fence, the mouse in the 
hall. 




(no) 



petekial ©inpifltitioi-) of the plpg§i©£ ©lai>i>, 18D1 



«o«> 



liN trenpblipg rpaioeps tpe rpv|sic class 6i6 j i rp e j 
Ope pearo tip e teacher speal^, ap6 tpep tpere Were bat pipe. 

Nipe trenpblipg rpaioeps carpe ip Vervi late, 

Ope 6i6 pot corpe at all, ap6 tpep tpere Were bat eigpt. 

biglpt trenpblipg rpaioeps rpucp ip pee6 of leaVep, 

Ope Vvas too pilarious, ap6 tpep tpere Were bat seVep. 

SeVep trenpblipg rpaioeps afraio of 'lectric prices, 

Ope jurppeo [ronp off t Ip e stool, ap6 tpep tpere Were bat six. 

Six trenpblipg rpaioeps npucp learpipg oi6 6eriVe, 
Yet Wpep exanpipatiops carpe, tpere Were oplv] fiVe, 

i iVe trerpblipg rpaioeps tpougpt Y pvisics quite a bore, 
Ope oecioeo spe Was ill, tpep tpere Were bat [our. 

j our persistept npaioeps, tpougp tol6 tlpevj coulo pot pass, 

do pass tpevj Ware oeterrpipeo, apo Woulo pot leaVe tpe class. 

(in) 



lii. l- m 







An Extract from "Notes and Queries 



>> * 



»X«Oo- 



w 



HAT are these? 
These are receptions. 
What receptions? 



The receptions given last year. 

Given ! to whom ? 

Oh, to all the classes and a special one to the Seniors. 

Who comes? 

All those invited who never attended one here before. 

Who are invited, and why don't they come a second time? 

Mostly fossils.f with a scarce sprinkling of that dangerous 
commodity, young men. The latter either die from the effects, 
and so are incapacitated for another, or make a desperate 
attempt to live and warn others. The former always loom 
up. 

Oh!! Do the girls like these receptions? 

The Freshmen. 

Do the Juniors? 

They never go ; they hang over the banisters as in illustra- 
tion 2, and watch the Seniors turn green. 

* Notes by the editor; queries by a prep. 

| Fossil : One whose sympathies are with a former time rather than with 
the present. — Webster. 



Why do the Seniors turn green? 

From envy of the Juniors 1 position. 

How long do the guests stay? 

They come at 8.30, and are turned out at 9. 

Can you go anywhere but in the parlors? 

No, on pain of being sent upstairs. { 

Why do the girls in illustration 3 look so funny? 

Because this girl has cabbaged || the only man. 

Why don't the girls in illustration 1 speak to the boys? 

They probably have their hands in their pockets, and so 
must be avoided, or else some one's particular friends, and this 
isn't a tete-a-tete. 

How can I escape such a fate? 

Refuse to be a member of any given class at any given time. 

Is this the only way? 

The only way. 

Can't I die? 

You can die. 

Then I will die ! 

% A pleasurable pain much sought after. 

|| A prep, is advised not to use "cabbage;" it isn't elegant, although 
expressive. 



('■3) 



T 



HERE was a man named Bragdon, 
Professor of Lasell, 
Who was very fond of reading 
And could tell a story well. 



Every morning while in chapel 
That dear old man would say, 

" I have a few choice bits here, girls, 
To think of through the day." 

And at the utterance of these words 

The girls would wink and sigh, 
For they knew quite well what ''choice bits" meant, 

And made a face full wry. 

" Last night Sam Jones a lecture gave 
On Christians of the day, — 

Why don't you listen to me awhile, 
And behave yourself, Miss Ray? 

" If you do not care to listen, 

Courteous at least you might be, — 
Now we'll take the list for Plymouth ; 

That's a place you all should see. 

"There is Peregrine White's cradle, 
And the monument so grand, — 

Will each girl who cannot say 
The ten commandments stand? 



" Harriet Scott, why don't you know them? 

Haven't you been to Sabbath school ? 
'Yes,' you say ; what did you do there? 

Did you only play and fool? 

" Every girl be sure to learn them, 
And learn them good and right, — 

Who will go to Riddle's reading 
O'er to Newtonville to-night? 

" Girls, just one more bit this morning, 

From the ' Zion's Herald ' it came, 
I clipped it out last evening — 

Did I get every name? 

" Be not simply good, 

Be good for something, girls, — 
Miss Whitney, this is not the place 
To be arranging curls ! " 

At last he looks up startled 

To find it is so late, 
And says, "Now for the letters, girls, 

Unless you'd rather wait. 

" But one thing more, before you go, 
My box, do not forget, 

Of all those notes I asked you for, 
Not one is in there vet." 



(in) 




B 



EHOLD at Lasell's portals, 

In the early evening hour. 
Stands papa's little comfort 
And mamma's sweetest flower. 



Her heart is in her bootlets, 

Her knees act very queer, 
And on her drooping lashes 

There hangs a tiny tear. 

She plucks up all her courage 

And enters at the door, — 
Then eagerly she looks around 

For an opening in the floor. 

She sees the new girls roaming 
Like sheep without the fold; 

Their pretty eyes swelled twice their size, 
With tears they cannot hold. 

She wonders in the daytime, 
What girl will ever love her? 

And sobs herself to sleep at night, 
With thoughts of home and mother. 



The "rules" and the "suggestions" 
She straightway learns by heart, 

For fear lest on a future day 
She may forget some part. 

She answers the old questions, 
Her name? her home? her age? 

And envious, eyes with wild surprise 
The Seniors grave and sage. 

By one the days speed onward. 

To her thev seem like years; 
But soon a great and gradual change 

In our little maid appears. 

The "rules" and the "suggestions" 

Are laid upon the shelf; 
She finds there's no one in the school 

Like her own sweet little self. 

The road into the village 

Resoundeth to her tread, 
And from her room at midnight 

Come sounds like these, 'tis said : 



(US) 



"Get a wiggle on those olives;" 
"These sandwiches are prime;" 

" If news of this gets out, I fear 
We'll seek another clime." 

She has her photo taken 

In a dozen different poses. 
At things in general turns up 

Her daintiest of noses. 

By dint of careful study 

In 'ologies and 'isms 
She can sometimes tell the difference 

Between round squares and prisms. 



She writes home to her father 

For tidy little sums; 
And takes her friend to see the tank 

As often as he comes. 

A multitude of cousins 

Spring up as in a night, 
Whose affection for their relative 

Is a truly touching sight. 

She's posted on the fashions; 

She wears her hair in curl ; 
And in her estimation 

She's a very stunning girl. 



And when she leaves the portals 

Which have guarded her so well, 
She's an air which says, " Make room for me, — 

I'm a graduate of Lasell ! " 




(n6j 





OUR FHCULTIE, 



*-^t^KSj?S<- 



w 



HAN that Aprile with his schowres swoote 

The drought of Marche hath perced to the roote, 
And bathed every veyne in swich licour, 
Of which vertue engendred is the flour — 

And Maye with hir floures al bedecked 

The thoughts how last year's Juniors had neglected; 

Neglecte for the lack of brains ye knowe, 

And tyme an streyngthe, fur they seem much slowe. 

So priketh Juniors now in their corages, 

Thanne longen them to telle their storages 

Of fact and fiction as is thus the rule 

In this, New England's fine Laselle scoole. 

First and most 'portant of the many features 

Is the descriptioune of eek the teachers. 

So seemeth it acordant to resoun 

To telle you alle the condicionne 

Of eek of hem so as it semede me. 

And which thej' weren, and of what degre, 

And eek in what array that they were inne. 

So at the Chief than wol I first begynne. 



Ah one ther was and that a worthie man, 

That from the tyme that he first bygan 

To teach about, he lovede honestie, 

Trouthe, honour, fredom, and curteisie. 

Al girles he constantly did eye 

In chapel whenere he them wold spie 

Whispering or laughing in some lecture deepe, 

And thus to theme he wolde always speeke : 

" Young ladies, I attentioune demande, 

Obey, or seken ye far straunge stronde." 

A longe trip took he to Holy Land, 

The many sights of interest fur to see. 

Stories he tells of places whiche ther be 

As wel in Christendom as in the hethenesse, 

And ever tells us to be generousse 

And work and always think of Missionary. 

Many horses has he in the stable ; 

Wel ken he sit on them and ride able. 

In every class he is ful pacieant, 

To qirls who have their lessons never learnt. 



("7) 



If tyme, much more ther is to telle 

Of him, the Head and Keeper of Laselle. 

With him ther was another, his left bower, 

A lovyerl and a lusty bacheler. 

With lokkes brown as they were laid in presse. 

Of thirty years of age he is, I guesse. 

A master of all science, Ph.B., 

Knows he entirly of the earth and sea. 

He treets of " micer," " laver," " strater," " tufer," 

Sir " Daner " and Le Conte he quotes from, wel, sir! 

He coulde compounds make and wel explaine ; 

Laugh and eek talk with scholars when he'd deigne. 

" Idears " numerous with him ther be. 

Wel couthe he synge and lead the service 

Of chapel with al much amazing power, 

His neck-tye red was as the poppy flower; 

For only swich a worthie man as he 

Was made the secretary of the Facultie. 

In looks he was not fat, I undertake, 

But lokede holwe and therto soberly. 

He was so worthie for to want office: 

For him was levere have at his beddes heede 

Twenty bookes clad in blak or reede 

Of chemistry and his philosophic 

Than robes rich, or mony new neck-tye, 

But al be that he is a philosophree. 

And al that he might of his tyme hente 

On bookes and on lernyng he it spente. 

Of studie took he most cure and most heede. 

Not oo word spok he more than was neede ; 



And that was said in forme and reverence 
And schort and guyk and ful of high sentence. 
Tending to mortal virtu was his speche 
And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teache. 



Ther was also a ladie, a Preceptress, 

That of hir smylyng was ful symple and coy. 

And sikerley sche was of gret disporte, 

And ful plesaunt and amyable of porte, 

And studied sche to counterfete cheere. 

Well knew sche how to call us al by "dearie." 

Ful fetys was hir cloak as I was waar; 

A string of beades 'round hir neck sche baar. 

A smale boy hadde schee that sche fedde 

And sent to scool and likewise sent to bedde. 

Sche wrong was for the one gret reson, 

To visit girls could go but once a seson. 

No where so busy a one as she ther was ; 

And vit sche semed busier than sche was. 



Another knew of hist'ry 'nd dates alle 

Way from the tyme that Adam dide falle 

Through years and years down to the present tyme; 

And name the kings too couthe sche al in rhyme. 

French sche spak full faire and fetjsly 

After the school of Willard in New Yorke ; 

For French of Parys was to hir unknowne. 

The table Francais was sche al its heade ; 

And read sche much and knew sche al sche reade. 

Ful wel honored, of gret esteem was she 



(nS) 



With scholars over al in this scoole, 

And eek with worthie women of the toun, 

For sche had pow'r of conversatioune. 

And one ther was of Bath in Maine, also, 

That unto Logik hadde long ago, 

A Mental Science instructress, oh ! 

Knew sche of every book in al this scoole, 

And eek the pictures couth sche name by rule. 

Ful semely hir wymple 'pinched waas. 

Hir dress was short and not so very tight. 

And liked sche wel al kinds of Woman's Right. 

At mete wel i-taught was sche with alle. 

Sche let no morsel from hir lippes falle, 

Ne wet hire fvngres in hire sauce deepe. 

Wel couth sche carrie a morsel and wel keepe 

That ne drape ne fel upon hir plate. 

Sche was schort schouldred, broade and thikke kuarre, 

A small felt hat upon hire head sche boare, 

Spelling sche taught, with it Geographie 

A worthie woman always is sche be. 

Of them a sixth ther is of much reporte 
That unto English always doth bald forte. 
The biggest dread of hir is long esseeys, 
Reviews, discussions, arguments, thesees. 
Sche teches figures of speeche and the rhyme, 
And wants al lights out on the very tvme. 
Ful wel sche sang the service devyne 
Entuned in hire heed ful semely. 
A smyle of gret plesaunce sche constant wore. 



But always kept wide ope hire chambre doore, 
So poore girls to visit after nine 
Could only fur that luxury repine. 



One teaching x and y, and a plus b, 

Is next upon the lyst as we schall see. 

Hir Alma Mater is this school Laselle, 

Fur here sche lerned much, and did full welle 

In al hir studies, as it now doth schow, 

Since Mathematycs al sche does wel know. 

Galileo lyke sche redes the stares, 

Studies the Earth, uncovers Mares. 

Sche was a worthie woman al hir lyfe. 

To pattern after hir take my advice. 



Another ther is, a faire fur the masterie 

Of Roman language wel i-taught waas sche. 

The wisdom of a heep of lernede men 

Was very symple whan to hir it kam. 

Then wolde sche speke no worde but the Latyn, 

And mony termes had she fur to say; 

No wonder is, sche herde it al the day. 

Wel couth sche write a booke al of Latyn; 

And Greek to hir waas just as smooth as satyn. 

At service the organ sche pleyed welle, 

The notes from out the pipes would forth swelle. 

And every rule couth sche pleyn by roote. 

Sche looked al nicely in a blacke coate, 

Dressed al in black, without a colored stripe. 

Of hir array I can no mar endite. 



("9) 



Still onee more ther is in this lerned scool, 

Who teaches German, and is very cool 

About hir learning which is greete indeed, 

In that of studie sche doth nothing need. 

Sche hadde passed mony strange streem 

To come to this lande from wher sche hadde been. 

Ful very pleasaunt was sche al the tyme ; 

But if were any scholar obstinat 

What so sche wer of high or low estat 

Sche wolde hir scolde scharpley on the spot 

And make it always fur hir pretty hot. 

At prayers at night sche pleyed the instrument; 

To holpen always sche hir aide lent. 

Al these gret persons mak the Facultie, 

Which august body ruleth this scoole. 

They come together every Monday night, 

To gossip, talk, joke, scheme, and plot and fight 

About the poore pupils, al in turn; 

Not one escapes their criticism stern. 

Their club-room is the teachers' parlor, 

And there they take in turn each scholar 

And weigh hir faults til very laite at night. 



At Publishing meeting they are of greet might 
And mak girls tremble with much fear, and blush, 
As at them parliamentary rules they rush. 
For al such courage strong which they posess, 
One thing ther is which mekes them powerless. 
And this one thing they let us not enjoy, 
Poor harmless urchin, 'tis the dreadful boy I 
A boy's the thing of al the rest the worst, 
And we are taught to shun him from the first. 
But, sad to say, such weighty minds as these 
Must have some faults, which do not ladies please. 
They like not demis nor the candy-store ; 
But of their faults I must not name them more. 

Now I have told you shortly in a clause 
Thestate, tharray, position, and the cause 
Of those assembled in this companie. 
But first I pray you of your curtesie 
That ye ne think it of my vileinye, 
Though that I speke al pleyn in this matere ; 
To telle you the wordes and the cheere, 
Ne tho', I speke here wordes properlie. 
For this ve knowen al so wol as I. 




(120) 



THE SPREHD. 

A Tragedy in Two Acts. 



Dramatis Persons. 

MISS DARING Hostess under restrictions. 

TOOL IE ........... Her room-mate. 

CHUM Miss Daring's friend. 

MISS SNIPPY The preceptress. 

Miss Daring's friends. 



ACT I. 

[SCENE: Guard-room at top of house. No lights. Time, 12 P.M. Enter after pre-arranged signal 
four maidens led by CHUM, all attired in Mother Hnbbards. Counting noses and finding all there, they seat 
themselves upon the floor, upsetting a bottle of olives, tumbler of felly, potted chicken, and a few such trifles. 
All try to talk at once, succeeding only in making a hubbub which it is feared will be heard outside, so set 
to work on the performance of the evening, and between the mouthfuls a short conversation is carried on.'] 

Chum. — I have longed to be an angel 

Here, and mitigate the dearth ; 
But I see plainly, though 'tis dark, 

I'm not long for this earth ; 
And strange as it may seem to you 
The world's made brighter by this view. 

ALL. — What's the row now, Chum? 

(12.) 



Chum. — O, nothing but the sugar, dears, 

The sugar's in the soup; 
That is, I dropped it on the stairs 

When coming to this coop. 
So now, of course we'll get found out, 
And sent off home, without a doubt. 

ALL. — We and you together, love, 
Never mind the sugar, love, 
It will be a clear, cold day 
When the Snips get left. 

\_TJicy thereupon jump up and begin a war dance with slight reference to dishes, remnants of 
sandwiches, et cetera, — the sandzvicJies making the floor softer to their tiny feet.~\ CURTAIN. 



ACT I I. 

[SCENE: SAME. Time, 12.4-j A.M. With increasing time speed of dance increases also; maiden 
stepping 011 peach-can emits a shrill scream like a seven o'clock zuhistle ; others trying to silence her increase 
the evidence of good lungs even unto a hundred-fold. Knock comes. Maidens drop hands, gaze farewelly 
at each other in the blackness, then look out for number one. Five fondly lock themselves into each other s 
arms in the spacious closet eighteen inches by tzventy-four ; as many more seek retirement beneath the simple 
cot; two fond ones, forgetful of their understaudijigs, delight in a screen; poor TOOLIE, as ever, unmindful 
of self, is precipitated in the fray, and an implement of spreadability passes through her sacrificial breast 
from north to south, — a peaceful end. MlSS DARING and CHUM each take to the fire -escape, one with a 
rope, one without. Door opens. Enter MlSS Snippy.] 

Miss Snippy. — Young ladies, to your rooms now go! 

I thought this plan to nip 
(122) 



Before it e'er should blossom forth, 
Or you could give the slip. 

I'll strike a light that I may see 

What this confusion means ; 
Upon the stairs I found your tracks — 

This is a scene of scenes ! 

[Forthwith she opens the closet door; in silence drags forth jive wan damsels whose gowns are 
bedraggled with the tears they have shed. Next, also in silence, the SNIP tugs at the unfortunates beneath 
the cot. By the might of her strong right arm she conquers, holding up as trophies an arm, two feet, 
several stockings, and remnants of gowns, which will serve as proof till the owners can be extricated. 
Behind the screen she next sallies, stepping with grace over the recumbent and unconscious body of the dead 
TOOLIE. By the hair of their heads these damsels are led to their mates and bidden to azvait their fate, 
each one given the care of a dismembered fragment of her mate. But — ] 

" O where, O where has the Daring gone, 

O where, O where can she be? 
I'll find her and Chum if I search all night long," 

Was the Snippy's soliloquy. 

[She moves to the fire-escape. Half-zvay down stands the DARING one; as she gazes up and meets 
the awful eye of Snip her foot in a curious manner removes itself from its resting-place, and she falls 
through the escape down, down, even down toward the bottomless pit, but not quite. A yell as from the 
loiver world rises on the midnight air, and the once supple form lies still on the cold, cold ground. Chum, 
who has taken the rope fire-escape, is disconcerted by the loud tone with which her friend utters zuhat she 
expected would be a signal, and forgets to fasten her rope to the iron. Sliding down with her whole weight 
it refuses to bear, and she drops to the place beneath, sending forth a companion shriek, thoughtlessly 
arousing the birds before dawn. Pleased with her work MlSS SNIPPV returns to the coivering forms.'] 

Miss Snippy. — Follow me! 

(123) 



\_By dark and circuitous paths she leads them to that awful den, the laboratory, where there is a 

confusion of vapors. They are seated around a burning pot, and she awaits the result. One after another 

their eyes begin to roll as the sun in its ceaseless course; the countenances turn from white to yellozv and 

then to blue ; in turn each one falls, always with her head into the seething caldron, and as the last cue 

falls 

CURTAIN FALLS. 



The bones of Chum and Daring are at rest; 
Maids whose untimely death was never known 
Until 'twas heard from Snippy's dying lips, 
Silent before for reasons of her own. 

Now heed while I a word of warning give : 
Ye maidens, there are holes in paper sacks, 
And when you wish to give a midnight spread, 
For pity's sake, do cover up your tracks. 

Ye teachers, ye will see 'tis sometimes best, 
When certain things upon the stairs ye find, 
To turn your heads around the other way, 
Remembering the old maxim, " Love is blind." 




(■24) 




BHGLlhWY 



7{C- 



C. C. B. — "Reasoning is worse than scolding." 

CHAMES. — " O, there is something in that voice that reaches 

The innermost recesses of my spirit." 
JOSEPH. — " One of the most impressive and dignified of men." 
CUSH. — "Take the open air, — the more you take the better." 
Carpy. — "Speak out plainly; be precise with facts and dates." 
FRAULEIN. — " It is only work that you want, indeed." 

" Come, here is work, begin." 
TAPPY. — " One of the most loving smiles imaginable." 
The Sisters. — "It is a delightful thing to see affection in families." 

(125) 



Davie. — "A heart that in his labor sings." 

ANGELTNE. — "Leave nothing fitted for the purpose untouch'd or slightly handled in discourse." 

WELLSY. — " The wise for cure on exercise depend." 

Madame. — "And talked with measured emphasized reserve." 

NURSIE. — "My body is from all diseases free, my temp'ra'te pulse does regularly beat." 

PACH. — "So light of foot, so light of spirit." 

BlLLY. — "Ripe in wisdom was he, but patient, and simple, and childlike." 

C'cst vrai ! "Nowhere so besy a man as this'n as, and yet he seemed besier than he was." 

" There was no sympathy between them. 
Their souls never approached, never understood, each other, 
And words were often spoken which wounded deeply." 

K. N-RM-N. — " Not to be laughed at, and scorned because little ot stature." 
M. W-TH-RB — . — "Yours is the charm of calm good sense." 

E. C CH. — "I too have my vocation — work to do." 

H. M-DSK-R. — "Much mirth and no madness." 

N. D-V-S. — "I am an off ox at bein' druv." 

R. Wh-TN-Y. — " Hair put up in some wild way, 

Decked with a hedgerose's spray." 
L. P-NN-Y. — "Let us be what we are, and speak what we think." 
J. Ry-n. — "The black-blue Irish hair, the Irish eyes." 
J. -rn-ld — " To one thing constant never." 



M. Br-DR-CK. — "She taketh most delight in music instruments and in poetry." 

M. M-LL-R. — " I hold it sinful to despond." 

K. H-M-LT-N-. — "Woman's at best a contradiction still." 

G. B-rnh-rt. — "The fat affectionate smile." 

G. C N. — "Thou hast betray'd thy nature and thy name." 

E. Pl-MM-r. — " You see through warping glasses." 

A. W-LST-N. — "You was turned up trumps originally, and trumps you must be till you die." 

A. G D-LL. — "Known unto few, but prized as far as known." 

A. K-LL-GG. — "Rightly to be great is not to stir without great argument." 

B. Br— NS— N. — "A bright little comely girl with large dark eyes." 
J. VV-ST. — "A spirit fit to start an empire." 

G. L D. — "A manner so plain, grave, unaffected, and sincere." 

L. Pr-CT-R. — "But always resolute in most extremes." 

M. F-LL-Y. — "Such a fresh, blooming, chubby, rosy-cosy, modest little bud." 

C. D-L-. — "I seem as nothing in the mighty world." 

V. W-CK-FF. — "They say she knew much that she never told." 

L. Th R. — "My little body is weary of this great world." 

H. N-BL-. — "Graceful without design, and unforeseeing." 

H. Sc-tt. — "A good child on the whole, meek, manageable." 

L. C-L— . — "I can guard my own." 

L. R-Y. — "Shy she was and I thought her cold." 

L. T-K-Y and AND-RS-N. — " Imparadised in one another's arms." 

(127) 



A. Cr-CK-R. — "Gars auld does look amaist as weel's the new." 
M. P. H-NS-N. — " Wild natures need wise curbs." 
J. V-L— S. — "I leave my character behind me." 

C. F-RQ-H-R. — " She was not inclined to labor 

For herself or for her neighbor, 

For she dearly loved her ease." 
L. App-L. — " My importance in school is not questioned ! " 
M. Fl— M-NG. — "Her words do show her wit incomparable." 
H. L-W-S. — "Thy locks uncombed like a rough wood appear." 

D. C-RT-S. — "A thin slip of a girl, like a new moon, 

Sure to be rounded into beauty soon." 
C. St L. — "My heart is true as steel." 

A. D-N-LL-N. — " One whom the music of her own vain tongue doth ravish like enchanting 

harmony." 
L— THR-P and L. Edd-. — "Great souls by instinct to each other turn, 

Demand alliance, and in friendship burn." 

B. E-T-N. — "I fly my thoughts like kites." 

S. B-ND. — "You were born for something great." 
L. H-K-LL. — "She tells you flatly what her mind is." 
J. R-CH. — "It would ill become me to be vain." 
S. B— RR-LL. — " Thou art inclined to sleep, 

'Tis a good dulness and give it way." 

02S) 



A. H-LM-S. — " After all, every one in this world can be dispensed with except the sun and myself." 
F. R— Y. — " Though short my stature, yet my name extends 
To heaven itself and earth's remotest ends." 

M. T L-R. — "For my voice I have lost it with howling and singing of anthems." 

M. McD-N-LD. — "Her sunny locks 

Hang on her temples like a golden fleece." 
C. Ch-MB-RL-N. — "I thus neglecting worldly ends all dedicated 

To closeness and the bettering of my mind." 
F. K-HN. — "All the courses of my life do show 

I am not in the roll of common men." 

L. C-RR R. — " She quits the narrow path of sense, 

For a dear ramble through impertinence." 

E. B-RB-NK. — " So very young, so spiritual, so slight and fairy-like a creature." 
P. H ST-N. — "A pearl of great price." 

A. C-L-. — "You are not an advocate for matrimony, I think." 

C. V-N S-CKL-. — "A babe in the home is a well-spring of pleasure." 

F. D-V-NP-RT. — "A young lady of fascinating manners, though small in stature and not particularly 

beautiful." 
C. J-HNS-N. — " You rather want somebody to look arter you, wen your judgment goes out er 

wisitin'." 
L. H-BB-RD. — "In outward show elaborate; 

In inward, less exact." 

(129) 



E. Edd-. — "What will Mrs. Grundy say?" 
A. Wh-t— . — " I'm neither cross nor proud." 

E. WH-T-. — "I still see something to be done." 
M. Br-TH-RT-N. — " Thou art a scholar." 

L. C-MST-CK. — "My attachments are strong attachments, and never weaken." 
M_ ST-N-. — "Mindful not of herself." 

D. M-LL-K-N. — "What change is there in you? You seem more anxious and more thoughtful 

than you used." 

F. St-DM-N. — "Her gentleness was equal with her youth." 
E M_s-n. — "Something quite out of the common." 

j? Sc LL-R. — "Let gentleness my stronger forcement be." 

j G-SK-LL. — "A melancholy smile to catch myself smiling for joy." 

y Ch-NDL-R. — "Her greatest merit was her love of learning." 

g W-LC-X. — " She had a great liking for show and bright colors." 

F G-RDN-R. — "A chief ingredient in my composition is a most determined firmness." 

S. K-NG. — "Childish, sweet, and woman-wise." 

A. Andr S-N. — "I dare do all that may become a man." 

E. B-RD-CK. — "One could see she was wise the moment one looked in her face." 
L. Wh-TN-Y. — "Impulsive, earnest, prompt to act." 

L p H-BB-RD. — "What she undertook to do she did." 

£ t T-YL-R. — "I am a part of all that I have met." 

g PH-LPS. — " O, who does know the bent of woman's fantasy." 

(130) 



G. Ad-MS. — "Never idle a moment, but thrifty and thoughtful of others." 
M. S-WY-R. — "A progeny of learning." 
L. S-YB-LT. — " Tetchy and wayward." 

A. Aldr-CH. — " Indued with sanctity of reason." 

B. Sh-NN— N. — "You're oncommon in some things, you're oncommon small, 

Likewise you're an oncommon scholar." 

C. -DDY. — " There was something very winning in her haughty manner." 

F. H-LM-S. — "Surely I shall be wise in a year." 

G. H— SK-LL. — "If to her share some female errors fall, 

Look on her face and you'll forget them all." 

B. L-LL-BR-DG-. — "They love the least that let men know their love." 
M. S M— N. — "Not beautiful in curve and line, 

But something more and better." 
M. B-RR. — "Thou hast no speculation in those eyes thou starest with." 
I. Sh-RT. — "A scorn for flattery and a zeal for truth." 
M. T-LL-YS. — " The light of love, the purity of grace, 

The mind, the music breathing from her face." 

J. St L. — " And lack of load made her life burdensome." 

M. W-GG-N. — "Hang sorrow, — care will kill a cat." 

J. H-YT. — "Past and to come seems best, things present worse." 

C. G-LM-N. — " What shall I do to be forever known." 

M. B- -M-NT. — "The next thing to being witty is to quote the wit of others." 



(13O 



N. Ch-S-. — "The first virtue is to temper well thy tongue." 
B-ss. i 

Ellw D. } " The law of love prevails." 

C-NN-LL. 

G. Sh-RM— n. — "She was made for happy thoughts." 

E. S-MNS. — "Little at the first, but mighty at the last." 
M. D RD-RFF. — "I am a pattern for housewives." 

G. R-B-NS-N. — "Gentle in mien, words, and temper." 

G. ALL-N. — "A hardy frame, a hardier spirit." 

J. W-LF-. — "The worst I know, I would do good to." 

G. Gl S-N. — "The force of her own merit makes her way." 

A. R— WL-— GH. — "Thou sayest an undisputed thing in such a solemn way. 

F. H-NSB-RG— R. — " Of my merit on thet point you yourself may jedge." 

D. Ch-PM-N. — "Some on antiquated authors pore." 

E. Sh-LD-N. — "I have a jest for all I meet." 

A. S GR-V. — "I was never less alone than when by myself." 

A. BR KS. — "Is all the laughter gone dead out of thee?" 

L. V-NC-. — "Like a statue solid set, 

And moulded in colossal calm." 
E. SCHL-M-. — "We don't all of us do what we ought, do us?" 
A. St-L-Y. — "She had the blithest little laugh you ever heard." 

G. Gr-FF-n. — " Her eyes' dark charm 'twere vain to tell." 

(132) 



H. Kn-WL-S. — "Her neat figure, her sober womanly step." 

U. C-L-. — "A bold heart yours." 

L. H-W-S. — " Home we love it and all that are there." 

N. R-CH-RDS. ~> 

> "We came so close we saw our differences too intir 

A. H-BB-RD. > 

B. C-MST-CK. — "I worked with patience which means almost power." 
M. W-RR-N. — " All graceful head so richly curled." 

M. C-S-. — "Fearless in her sweet maidenhood." 

E. D-C-. — "The calm of self-reliance." 

A. N-BL-. — " I'll versify in spite, and do my best 

To make as much waste paper as the rest." 
J. H— GG. — "I know you're proud to bear your name." 



MISCELLANEO US. 



CONCERTS. — "How slight a thing will disturb the equanimity of our frail minds." 
Gymnasium. — "'Tis not enough to help the feeble up, 

But to support him after." 
"LOST DRAWER." — "I am but a gatherer of other men's stuff." 
'91 Entertainment. — "Fame and censure with a tether 

By fate are always linked together." 

(133 



PRACTICE Cooking. — " Who can cloy the hungry edge of appetite 

By bare imagination of a feast?" 
Alumna. — " Lost to sight, to memory dear." 
Catalogue. — "A delusion, a mockery, and a snare." 
Chapel Organ. — "How poor an instrument may do a noble deed." 
Sword Drill. — "It was no chylden's game." 
Faculty Meeting. — " The hope of all who suffer, 

The dread of all who wrong." 
LASELL. — "Man seems the only growth that dwindles here." 
CHEMISTRY Class. — " Bearing all down in thy precipitancy." 
CUSTARD. — "Whence and what art thou, execrable shape?" 
Our Oldest Member. — "One more unfortunate, 

Weary of breath, 
Rashly importunate, 
Gone to her death." 
EDITORS. — "Let us not burthen our remembrance with a heaviness that's gone." 
'93 ALLERLEI. — "In every work regard the writer's end; 

For none can compass more than they intend, 
And if the means be just, the conduct true, 
Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due." 



'134) 




J± 


ARNOLD. 


co U 


CH. 


N 


OBLE. 


DAV I ! 


S. 


BR O 


DRICK. 


GA R 


DNER. 


III CO 


HORT. 


H 


UBBARD. 


sco U 


LLER. 


R 


ICHARDS. 


bR 


OTHERTON 


G A 


SKILL. 




(136) 



^^ 



INDEX 



Page 

Edward Lasell 12 

Lasell Building, 185 1 14 

Lasell Building, 1S92 15 

Dedication 17 

Not fast or slow, but always on time, 19 

Editors 20 

Preface 21 

Board of Trustees 23 

Faculty 24 

Calendar 27 

Classes 30 

Freshman Quotation 31 

Register 33 

Freshman History 34 

Sophomore Quotation 37 

Register 39 

Sophomore History 40 

Junior Quotation 43 

Register 45 

Junior History 46 

Senior Quotation 49 

Register 51 

Senior History 52 

Irregulars 53 

When will the Allerlei be Out ? . . 57 



Page 

In Memoriam 58 

Club Skeleton 59 

Lasellia Club 61 

S. D. Society 63 

S. D. Society Banquet"! r 
Lasellia Club Banquet 1 

First Lasell Banquet 65 

Hawkodakai Club 68 

History of the Hawkodakai Club . . 69 

Christian Associations 72 

Dress Cutting 73 

The Only Survivor 74 

Swimmers 75 

Prizes, 1891 76 

Juniata 77 

Lasell Battalion 7S 

A look — Before and After .... 79 

Lasell Leaves Si 

Studio S2 

Matrimony 83 

Senior Statistics S4 

In Memoriam 85 

Cooking Classes 86 

Poetry of Cooking S7 

Music S8 

(137) 



Page 

Piano-forte Quartettes 90 

Lasell Quartette ... ... 91 

Orphean Club 92 

Guitar Club 93 

G. B. O. Queen 94 

Sweet Strains of Music 95 

Junior Entertainment 96 

Class Effigy 97 

Class Day Programme 9S 

Class Rhymes 99 

Class Song 102 

" Premeditated Bum" 104 

Mishaps of the '93's 105 

"This is the village of Auburndale." 10S 

Physics Class, 1891 in 

An Extract from "Notes and Que- 
ries" 113 

Professor of Lasell 114 

Lasell Girl 115 

Our Facultie 117 

The Spread 121 

Grinds — Faculty 125 

Miscellaneous 133 

Val e 135 

Juniors' Hurra ! 136 




Index to Advertisements. 



Page 

Art Publishing Co 144 

Bent & Bush 145 

Boston & Albany R.R 9 

Bouquet, Millinery . . 5 

Clapp, Otis, & Son . . . -. 146 

Cobb, Aldrich, & Co 4 

Dame, Stoddard, & Kendall 141 

Dreka, Stationery 147 

Estev Organ Co 140 

Everett Piano 149 

French, Benj 142 

Frost & Adams 147 

Gay, Aaron R., & Co 142 

Goldthwait, Joel, & Co 143 

Grace, Mrs. J. J 5 

Hammond, Knowlton, & Co 6 

Hollander, L. P., & Co 3 

Jenkins, O. A., & Co 140 

Lawrence, Wilde, & Co 145 



Page 

Lloyd, Andrew J 145 

Long, Thos., & Co 143 

Marshall, Photographer 145 

Mason & Risch 142 

McFarlin, Geo. R 5 

Neat, Nathan, & Co 146 

Oliver Ditson Company 2 

Pray, John H., Sons, & Co 7 

Rockwell & Churchill 141 

Samuel Ward Company 5 

Shepard, Norwell, & Co 143 

Skinner, Alvah, & Son 146 

Springer Brothers i-iS 

Stearns, R. H., & Co 8 

Thayer, McNeil, & Hodgkins 2 

Wadsworth, Howland, & Co 143 

Wells, Dr. A. L., Jr 146 

Wethern, Geo. M 5 

Whitney (handkerchiefs) 10 



(138). 



o. a. jmF)iN3 er Co., 



Fine B 



urs. 



-A-T HEDT7CED PRICES. 




LADIES' BNCiUSM AND TRENCH 

Walking 1bats. 



407 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 



Is the name which we 
ask you to remember 
when about to purchase 
an Orj^an. 



#■ 



159 TRBMONT &TJRB&T, 



BOSTON. 



(i 4 o) 




Dame, Stoddard & Kendall, 

Headquarters for 

Cutlery Jfiebino ZaMc 
jfine leather (Boofcs . . 

Xawn tennis 

(S^mnaeium Supplies . 

1ko5aft s (£aiTtera6=1E>awke£e , 

PHOTOGRAPH WORK FOR AMATEURS A SPECIALTY. 

§74 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 





£be 



IRocfcwell & (Eburcbtll 

press, 

41 Hrcb Street, Boston. 

# 



/Ifcakers of jfine 36oofcs like tbe "2lllerlei," etc. 




(HO 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

Stationers and Account Hank Manufacturers, 

Ruling, 
Printing 
and Binding. 

For Fountain Pens Use the "IDEAL.' 

Prices, $2.50, $3.00, $3-50 and $4.00, 
according to size. 





122 STATE STREET. 



BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS 

and Materials 

FOR AMATEURS. 

•IN 

Largest and Best Selected Stock 

in the East 

Expert Instruction Free to Patrons. 

Benj. French & Co. 

319 Washington Street, Opp. Milk: St., 

BOSTON. 



Mason & Risch 
Vocalions. 



For Churches, Chapels, Schools and 
Music Rooms. 



The Only REAL SUBSTITUTE 
FOR A GOOD 
PIPE ORGAN. . . 

Send for Prices and Catalogue, 

containing testimonials from eminent Musicians, fully sub- 
stantiating the claim 

Boston Warerooms : New York Warerooms : 
151—153 Tremont St. 10 East 16th St. 

Factory at Worcester. Mass. 



The Vocalion is Used at Lasell Seminary. 



(142) 



DO YOU USE 



W. H. &Co'sOil and Water Colors? 

KL S Easel nWH-boi-D 




1/21 — "nsV c H 

Canvas 




Kfglpl 



84yWAs^|!iGTON St. 

y Boston 




It will pay you to try them. 
Send for our catalogue of 

ARTISTS' OUTFITS 
AND MATERIALS. 

Special terms to Lasell students. 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

Mfrs. of 

Artists' Oil and Water Colors, 
Sketching Outfits, 

Drafting Instrument". 

Catalogue mailed free. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 

S2 & 84 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 
Factories, Malden, Mass. 



THOMAS LONG & CO. 

11 SUMMER STREET, 

BOSTON, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS. 



Novelties 



. IN . 



Novelties ! 



^JEWELRY 



OF ALL KINDS. 



GOLD. — Solid and Plated. 
SILVER —Sterling and Plated. 

Hair Ornaments of every description. 

Sterling' Silver, Tortoise Shell, &c, &c. 



Thomas Long, 
Boston. 



Frank F. Davidson. 
Auburndale. 



JOEL QOLDTHWAIT <£r C2. 

fHNE CARPET5 
AND W 

ORIENTAL RCIQ5, " 

162T2 169 WAJHINQTON STREET, 
B05T0N. 



Shenarf. 



ell 



u 



Importers of 



RIBBONS, 
LACES, 
and KID GLOVES. 

Headquarters for 

hatheway's 
Fine underwear. 

Winter Street & Temple Place, 
BOSTON. 



('4.0 




(■44) 



ESTABLISHED 1870. 



. THE 



Hndreiaz J. Lloyd, 
* ©pttcian, •:• 

323 WASHINGTON STREET (o PP . oid south church), 

iP 254 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



FOX 




PATENT. 



Sole Agent for trie Fox Patent Eye-Glasses. 
OPHTHALMIC SURGEONS' OROERS A SPECIALTY. 

STUDENT'S DISCOUNT. 



B 



ENT & 
USH . 




Hatters and 
Furriers . . 

MANUFACTURERS OF . 

Caps .... 




IN ALL SHAPES 



387 

WASHINGTON 
STREET 
BOSTON. . . . 



GRAY TINT . . 
PHOTOGRAPH •* 

. . . (PERMANENT) . . . 

LOOKS JUST LIKE . 
AN ENGRAVING, SO 
SAYS EVERYONE . . 

A Specialty of 
Marshall .... 
Photographer 





122 

BOYLSTON 
STREET . . 
BOSTON . 



Iawrdnce, Wilde 4 to., 



Manufacturers of First-Class 



"- furniture * 



— AND- 



Nos. 38 TO 48 Cornhill, 

§03TON. 



Wm. H. Hull. 
F. D. Wilde. 
Geo. B. Darrow. 



('45) 



Use JAPODOp for tljB TeetJi. 



SAPODONE is the trade name for a liquid, saponaceous dentrifice which is 
giving perfect satisfaction to those that use it. It contains no injurious ingre- 
dients, or substance, the use of which the most exacting dentist could not 
fully approve. 

It cleanses the teeth and sweetens the breath, and leaves a cool, refreshing sensa- 
tion in the mouth. 

We desire to call your attention to this preparation, and invite you to give it a trial. 

DIRECTIONS FOR USE. — First wet the brush, then add a small quantity of Sapo- 
done, and apply to the teeth in the usual manner. 

Sapodone is put up in two sizes: 2-ounce vial, price 35 cents; 3>2-ounce vial, 
price 50 cents. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

OTIS CLflPP & SON, 



10 Park Square, 

Boston, 



307 Westminster St., 



Providence. 



Dr, A, L> Wells, Jr, 

MEDICINAL. SURGICAL, OPERATIVE AND PROSTHETIC TREATMENT 

OF THE 




EETH. 



Office : 
44 BOYLSTON STREET, 

BOSTON, 






^ 




lamo 




* 



HND OTHER PRECIOUS STONES- 



iva 



Up IV Flight. 



aimer 

6 Winter Street. 



■on, 



Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Fine Trunks ai\tl Travelling Bags, 

Basket Trunks and Steamer Chairs. 

Stateroom and Light-W 'eight Trunks for European Travel, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

47 BOYLSTON STREET 

Next to Masonic Temple, 

Boston, Mass. 



( H 6) 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Becomfi&e Jcto ^oo^ of aff kinus. 

HANDBOOKS OF INSTRUCTION ON ALL ART SUBJECTS. 

Supplies for Oil Color, Water Color, China, Lustra, and Tapestry Tainting. 
Studies for all branches of Art Work. 

Mathematical Instruments, Drawing Paper, and T Squares, 
architects' anD ^Engineers' Supplies 



IN GENERAL. 



Picture Framing in All Styles. 



37 Cornhill, Boston, Mass. 

Catalogues free on application. Mail orders receive prompt attention. 
F. S. FROST. H. C. GARDNER. H. A. LAWRENCE. 



DREKA 

Fine Stationery and Engraving Hnnsn, 

1121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



COLLEGE INVITATIONS 
CLASS STATIONERY 
FRATERNITY STATIONERY 
PROGRAMMES, BADGES 



WEDDING INVITATIONS 
VISITING CARDS 
BANQUET MENUS 
DIPLOMAS AND MEDALS 



STEEL PLATE WORK FOR FRATERNITIES, CLASSES 
AND COLLEGE ANNUALS. 

All work is executed in the establishment under our personal supervision, 
and only in the best manner. Unequalled facilities and long practical ex- 
perience enable us to produce the newest styles and most artistic effects, 
while our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of the productions of 
this house. 

Designs, Samples and Prices sent on application. 

HALF TONE, PHOTOTYPE AND PHOTO-ELECTRO ILLUSTRATIONS 
furnished from photographs, designs sent us or designs furnished by us. 



(•47) 




PRINGER BROTHERS 

500 washincton street .... the | LOAK MANUFACTURERS. 



Cor. BEDFORD STREET, BOSTON- 




£* 




SEASONABLE 

GARMENTS . 

in GREAT .... 

VARIETY . . 



a 





HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Fashionable Cloaks. 





<A» 




PRICES . . . 

VK/zy . . . . 

REASONABLE 

for RELIABLE . . 



GOODS 




a 




Discount to Teachers and Students of 
all the leading educational i n stitution s. 



(I 4 S) 



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